Goa Tourism Policy

Draft for discussion






Preparation of Goa’s Tourism Master Plan and Policy
Draft Report – Final Presentation and report on Module 3: Development of Draft Tourism Master Plan for Goa

Department of Tourism, Government of Goa











KPMG.com/in


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Table of contents





1.



Development model Development Strategies
Qualitative tourism goals
• Positioning
• Products
• Markets
Quantitative tourism goals
Development principles & guidelines



2.

Core tourism Infrastructure Tourism programs
Investment and funding analysis
Phasing
Tourism circuits


Table of contents




3.

Support tourism infrastructure Core infrastructure
Transport and connectivity
Human resource and training
Transversal tourism infrastructure


4.
Commercialization & Promotion Tourism intelligence unit
Destination C&P
Products C&P

5. Facilitating Tourism policies and application framework




























1.



Development
model Development Strategies
Qualitative tourism goals
• Positioning
• Products
• Markets
Quantitative tourism goals
Development principles & guidelines



Key strategies for development of the Master Plan
















Benchmarking principles


• All selected destinations are well known for their wide offering in Coastal and Sun & Beach tourism

• The benchmark is based on an analysis of the official websites for each destination

• It is assumed that the website is one of the major tools used by tourism destinations organizations to promote and highlight products and experiences. Therefore, we can ensure that destination website is essential to position the brand







An analysis has been conducted in order to understand the key attributes in each destination website.
“High presence” - attribute appears in the main page or in a highlighted area. Medium presence - navigation process through different search menus. Low presence - difficult to find or it limited availability


Country

Sri
Lanka


Bali


Ibiza


Kerala


Maldives


Mauritius


Thailand


Goa





Nautical Tourism

Core attributes







Business & MICE







High
presence


Medium presence



Low
presence


Benchmark observations
• All listed destinations are known for their coastal tourism offer. However, Sun & Beach (Coastal) tourism is not enhanced as the core attribute of these destinations.
• It is assumed that the destination has “taken for granted” that tourists know about this offer and they choose to highlight
other products which they want to promote.
• All these destinations give high or medium importance to Culture & Heritage (except Maldives), Sports & Adventure and Nautical Tourism (except Sri Lanka and Thailand)
• All these destinations present a high diversification in their product portfolio across 6-10 products with high / medium presence
• Within this context, some websites concentrate their web communication in limited products to enhance them:
 Maldives highlights luxury tourism
 Kerala focuses on Culture & Heritage
 Thailand emphasizes Shopping
• Nightlife is not highlighted greatly, even in destinations like Ibiza or Thailand, famed for this feature. This could probably denote that either they do not need to promote these features as they are already well known (similar to Sun & Beach tourism product); or that they do not prefer advertising this type of product due to possible negative connotations.
• Goa’s website provides a wide set of activities within the “Explore” and “Things to do” sections. The home page does not focus on specific positioning in terms of its destination or its products, “White water rafting” appears as the first highlighted product.

Positioning matrix: Goa aims to become a multi-product destination, where culture & heritage and leisure & entertainment would play a major new role



Coastal Tourism (incl. Sun & Beach, Nature, Sports & Adventure)

Sri Lanka
Bali
Ibiza
Kerala
Maldives
Mauritius
Thailand
Goa (today)
Goa (future)

Nature Based Tourism (incl. Nature Based)

Culture & Heritage (incl. Culture & Heritage, Culinary Tourism)

Sri Lanka
Bali
Ibiza
Kerala
Maldives
Mauritius
Thailand
Goa (today)
Goa (future)

Leisure & Entertainment (incl. Nightlife, Shopping, Health & Wellness)




Qualitative tourism goals - Positioning matrix – Goa’s positioning vs type of visitor

High intensity Medium intensity

Current Future

International Domestic International Domestic Marketing Strategy

Low intensity

1
Coastal Tourism







Qualitative tourism goals - Repositioning Goa as a multi-product destination




• Evolve from a majorly Sun & Beach tourism destination to a Coastal tourism destination



Proposed evolution of Goa as a Tourism Destination

• Develop a multi-product destination where Culture & Heritage will play a major role to attract both international and domestic tourists.

• More diversified and quality leisure & entertainment offer, mainly addressed for domestic tourists

• Nature-based tourism will be a focus product
















Qualitative tourism goals – Geographical markets strategy




Very Short term

Short term

Medium term


















Very short term: on going/ current markets
Short term: 2 - 4 years
Medium term: within 5 years

Keep addressing domestic market & current nationalities but with a different proactive marketing approach
Higher-spending segments within the coastal tourism product with a better and more diversified offer, including culture and nature tourism

Tap into the markets for short breaks and holidays with new direct flights from the


Develop the cultural tourism offer of Goa to attract these nationalities. This would be the main motivation to visit India – and Goa as an extension

Though most tourists would still stay on the coast, culture and nature-based tourism would be a main travel motivation for some tourists and complementary products for others.

Depending on identified new opportunities, further diversify markets such as Australia, through a multi-product destination, where cultural tourism would play a major differentiation role.

Middle East.


Products / geographical market strategy: attractiveness levels



High intensity Medium intensity Low intensity

Very short term markets (existing/ current)

Short term markets

Mid term











Quantitative tourism goals – for higher spending tourists with increased international tourism


Scenarios analysed for total tourist arrivals (2017 to 2031) – Current/ Normalized/ Optimistic
Current scenario Normalized scenario Optimistic scenario

• Tourist arrivals calculated based on DoT statistics; change in calculation methodology not factored
• Compounded Annual Growth Rate (“CAGR”) – 6.62% (1985 to 2015)
• 2031 projected total arrivals – 14.7mn • Tourist arrivals calculated post the normalisation of CAGR numbers due to additional sources of information from tourist entry points being considered in arriving at inbound tourist statistics; namely
• Railway stations
• KTCL bus transport services
• Private bus operators
• Vehicle tolls on State borders
• CAGR – 4.51% (2009 to 2013)
• 2031 projected total arrivals – 10.7mn
• Tourist arrivals calculated based on a CAGR which factors in the long term impact of the Tourism Master Plan
• CAGR – 7.00%
• 2031 projected total arrivals – 15.6mn
• The Current and Optimistic scenarios are fairly similar in absolute numbers, however the calculation methodology of the
total tourist arrivals in the Current scenario has not been uniform over the years.
• These changes in methodology have affected the historic CAGR, hence a CAGR using a normalized scenario has been applied for the purpose of projections
• The base for all scenarios are actual 2015 tourist arrival numbers, normalization has been conducted on the CAGR only.
Focus of tourism growth will be on
1. International tourism - Limited growth and increased number of higher spending
2. Domestic tourism - Limited growth and shift to higher spending
3. Healthy mix of domestic and international tourists from 90 – 10% (current) to 80 – 20% by 2031 Source : DoT Goa


Quantitative tourism goals - reducing seasonality



Seasonality benchmark goals
• Need for reducing seasonality – High seasonality features high congestion during peak season and lower asset utilization during periods of low demand

• Benchmark Seasonality –
• Jan to Mar – 25%
• Apr to Jun – 25%
• Jul to Sep – 15%
• Oct to Dec – 35%

• Methods to reduce Seasonality –
• Increased utilization of Culture, Heritage, Nature, Eco- tourism, MICE and Edutainment tourism products during the non Oct – Dec periods

• Increased arrivals at events like Carnival & Shigmotsav



Quantitative tourism goals – estimate of revenues*


Quantitative tourism goals*


Today Future potential


2016 base
5,536,837
Total arrivals

2031 goal
10,730,735
Total arrivals












Domestic International Domestic International


Visitor expenditure
INR 2,752/ day

ALS
5 days

Visitor expenditure
INR 4,197/ day

ALS
9 days

Visitor expenditure
INR 4,128/ day

ALS
5 days

Visitor expenditure
INR 8,257/ day

ALS
7 days




Total visitor expenditure
INR 9,060.21 cr

Total visitor expenditure
INR 30,125.71 cr

Quantitative tourism goals – impact on employment and GDP*



2021 2026 2031
Incremental employment creation
Employment: direct contribution 1,21,760 1,72,979 2,55,421
Employment: total contribution 3,52,463 5,00,731 7,36,483




2016 base 2021
goals 2026
goals 2031
goals CAGR 2016 -
2031 Multiplier Ratio
Total contribution to GDP
GDP: total contribution (in INR Cr.) 16,308 24,120 35,319 54,227 8.3% 3.32



(*) Normalized scenario (Ref. earlier slides) at constant prices

Source: Tourism Sector in India, Parliament library and reference, research, documentation, and information service

Quantitative tourism goals – tourism arrivals goals compared to other reference destinations



2015 (p) 2016 (e)

2015 (p) 2015 (p)

2026 (e)

2016/2026 (e)





3 Bali 4,001,000 4,601,000 7,147,100 11,148,100 Not
available

4 Ibiza 2,546,400 862,000 3,408,400 Not
available
5 Kerala
977,479
12,465,571
13,443,050 Not available



6 Maldives 1,303,000 1,350,000 2,200,000 +69%


7 Mauritius 1,154,000 1,173,000 1,700,000 +47%


8 Belize 316,000 315,000 450,000 +42%


















Principles

• Elaborate a tourism development plan that is acceptable to the stakeholders of Goa, with an emphasis on enhanced quality and quantity of higher spending tourists, both domestic and foreign
• Achieve this goal through a strong diversification of the tourism product using all relevant and varied tourism assets, wherever they are located
• Consider the entire State as a potential tourism development area, which implies changing the past and current development pattern focused on the coast
• Conserve the natural and cultural assets deemed of high value by stakeholders which act as major attractions
for tourism, on the coastal stretches not yet developed and in the hinterlands
• Address existing and future development requirements highlighted by creating physical plans that respond to that direction.
• Phase tourism development so that there are opportunities in the near term (2-5 years) and for a 10 year period from now.
• Take a broad look at sustainability, which implies ensuring low scale tourism development in the hinterlands of the State respectful not only with nature but also with the local culture, in line with the principles established in the Goa Regional Development Plan
• Provide a conceptual tourism planning model that considers all these principles at State, Taluka and local specific levels.
• Identify specific potential locations or locations’ profiles for redevelopment, enhancement and/or new
development.











• Nature sanctuaries in the hinterlands and the coast,
• Pristine beaches in certain talukas to be protected from high pressure in terms of possible development through high quality offerings

• Coastal areas: applies to parts of the coast, mainly in the upper North and mid/ extreme South, where no/ limited development is present.
• Hinterland areas (Ghats and Midlands): Applicable for developments in designated areas to create “clusters” of nature/ culture-based attractions/ activities
• Low density should also be paired with low rise buildings (Ground floor only or GF+1)

• Present on the Goan coast in stretches, as well as in some urban areas
• “Mass” development could be authorised in specific new designated places such as next to airport or development for specific programs

Density models – Built up units (such as apartment/ room) per hectare, thus shaping the landscape and scenery

Applicable to Hinterlands And Coastal Areas

In some Coastal/ Urban Areas/ near Airport High density (60+ units
/ha)














Revised Regional Plan density targets seem to be in line with tourism needs

Maximum permissible Built Up Area statements



Plot areas below 350 sqm
FAR (ratio) = 80



Plot areas below 4,000 sqm
FAR (ratio) = 80


Plot areas 4,000 sqm and above
FAR (ratio) = 60

Plot areas below 4,000 sqm
FAR (ratio) = 60


Plot areas 4,000 sqm and above
FAR (ratio) = 50


Source: Regional Plan for Goa 2021


Specific development guidelines for the Coast



Low- Medium density resorts developed and or operated by international brands to better position the destination with sustainable projects

“Marine nature and life parks” - Partially preserved beaches to offer an adapted environment for flora
and fauna (terrestrial and marine).



Ultra luxury
Eco-Beach


Nightlife/ Party



Pernem
Pernem


Bardez

Mapusa

Spatial Planning focus area


Bicholim

Bicholim Sattari


Territorial vision
Mass tourism development
Low- Medium tourism

• “Big club” resorts
• New generation campsites
• Beach Clubs
• Quality programmes to manage pollution levels, cleanliness and sanitation and definition of swim

North Goa
Panjim
Tiswadi
EntertainmentPonda
Vasco da Gama
MormuCguaolinary Ponda

Sattari






Dharbandora
Dharbandora

development
Very Low density development & Protected Areas

zones



Festivals/ beach events


Low density resorts

Culture &
Entertainment


Luxury accommodation & High end retail




Margaon
Salcette









Quepem








Sanguem
Sanguem



Integrated leisure destinations –
Beach access/ security/ cleaning/ quality of sea water/ toilets/ parking/ creation of jetties/ square with F&B facilities/ small markets/ watersports facilities including schools (sailing, surf, board) in some cases as part of an integrated project to welcome tourists



Beach Clubs Medium density
tourism

Eco-beach low
density

South Goa

Quepem

Chaudi
Canacona




Low density tourism development & protected areas:
• Hinterland areas - special interest and preserved / protected from mass tourism flows and developments.
• Attractions - local flora / fauna, a proper botanic garden, new protected
areas and special interest zones, marked trekking trails




Pernem
Pernem

Territorial vision
Karnataka



Bicholim

• Low density tourism eco-lodges with an orientation towards environmental and social promotion.




Panjim

Bicholim

North Goa




Sattari

• Agri tourism can also be promoted central areas of the state.
• Homestays meshing culture with tourism
Adventure & Sports tourism:
• Tourism activities and experiences which might cause greater territorial impact, proposaed in areas with lower environmental value.

Tiswadi

Vasco da Gama
Mormugao




Ponda

Ponda



Margaon
Salcette





Dharbandora
Dharbandora




Sanguem

• Improve existing experiences by upgrading products, facilities and
infrastructure.
Nature and Waterways Tourism
• In the vicinity of the Mopa airport, and along the River Chapora waterways can be developed to promote nature based tourism through promenades, jetties and river cruises.







Adventure & Sports tourism
Low density tourism Wildlife Sanctuaries/


Quepem


South Goa

Quepem

Chaudi
Canacona

Sanguem

National Park





Character images to illustate density development

• Low density tourism development & Protected areas
• Adventure & Sports tourism
• High end nature tourism






Specific development guidelines for the Hinterlands: Culture-Based Tourism



• Key heritage / cultural and pilgrimage tourism assets appear to be concentrated around the central region of Goa, particularly in Bardez, Tiswadi, Ponda, Mormugao and Salcette talukas.
• Different routes / circuits need to be created showcasing tourism assets across these talukas.
— Route / circuit discovering the Goan legacy/ heritage: houses, forts, churches, monuments, blgs.







Immersion in local culture





Pernem
Pernem


Ba










Bicholim

Exploring heritage structures and traditions




Sattari

Sattari

— Route / circuit of the temples
— Village walks – Chandor, Siolim, Pernem and Divar
— City/ Town tours – Panaji, Margao, Mapusa, Old Goa and other

Exploring
Goan churches and temples

Panjim
Tiswadi Mormugao




Ponda






Dharbandora
Dharbandora

major cities/ towns
• Museums, theatres, interpretation centres and event venues located at key tourist spots in the talukas.
• A different strategy is proposed for talukas with presence of isolated assets (Bicholim, Sattari, Dharbandora,Sanguem,

Exploring
Goan villages (Portuguese influence)

Exploring Goan villages (Goan way




Margaon

Salcette
5







Sanguem


Sanguem

Quepem and Canacona). Day excursions / visits can be organized from nearby towns / villages. Or these assets to other themed and/or multi-product routes/ circuits.
• Alternately immersion in the local culture can be facilitated through the medium of community tourism, primarily homestays and visits

of life) & ancient
rock cut caves


Visits, Sight- seeing, Multi- product routes & Community tourism

Quepem



Chaudi

6


Canacona


Hotel strategy – Standards and classifications

High service disparities in accommodation infrastructure
• Serviceability levels among accommodation options within the same star/ DoT hotel categories
• Traveler expectations and actual services offered, especially in bookings made though online media
• Basic traveler requirements not serviced at lower category establishments
Key solutions proposed
• Re-establishing standards for each classification (e.g. A, B, C, D and Heritage) in order to make them relatable to globally recognized classification standards (e.g. European Hotelstars Union, World Hotel Rating, AAA Diamond Ratings or Forbes Travel Guide ratings)
• Ensuring an enforcement mechanism for adherence to required service standards
• Voluntary special labels
Benefits of re-establishing standards and monitoring
• Higher customer satisfaction, promoting repeat visits and positive word of mouth
dissemination in the industry
• Higher value realization for travelers at accommodation establishments
e.g. At Santa Susana- key destination of Costa de Barcelona, especially for European families, the accommodation offer is mainly comprised by quality hotels of 3/ 4 stars (built before 2000). However the opening of two 5-star type hotels in the last three years encouraged surrounding establishments to upgrade and renew their offer.


Accommodation Strategy: Diversification of the tourism experience


















Examples of land requirements according to the zoning in the Regional Plan applied to accommodation




Luxury Eco-Resort (30 Suites
+ 20 Branded Villas)
PROPOSED PROJECT/ PROGRAM
 Total rooms: 50
 Area/ Room Ratio: 180 sqm
 Total Built Up Area: 9,000 sqm

LAND REQUIRED ACCORDING TO ZONING
 VP 1: 15,000 sqm (FAR 60%)
 VP 2: 18,000 sqm (FAR 50%)

4-Star Eco-Lodge (40 Rooms +
20 Cabañas)

PROPOSED PROJECT/ PROGRAM
 Total rooms: 60
 Area/ Room Ratio: 120 sqm
 Total Built Up Area: 7,200 sqm

LAND REQUIRED ACCORDING TO ZONING
 VP 1: 12,000 sqm (FAR 60%)
 VP 2: 14,400 sqm (FAR 50%)

Eco-Cottage & Camps ( 20
Cottages + 40 Tented Camps)

PROPOSED PROJECT/ PROGRAM
 Total rooms: 60
 Area/ Room Ratio: 90 sqm
 Total Built Up Area: 5,400 sqm

LAND REQUIRED ACCORDING TO ZONING
 VP 1: 9,000 sqm (FAR 60%)
 VP 2: 10,800 sqm (FAR 50%)






























2.

Core tourism Infrastructure Tourism programs
Investment and funding analysis
Phasing
Tourism circuits


27 programs have been defined to develop the Master plan

































Understanding the programs’ structure








Draft for discussion

Coastal Tourism Programs


Flagship programs Quick Wins





Regeneration/ Up gradation of Beaches
Across Goan beaches. Pilot Projects – N. Goa: Calangute, Candolim, Baga, Arambol.
S. Goa: Colva, Palolem
Fishermen Market and F&B Court
Brittona, Chapora Bay, Siridao and Mobor


High-end lifestyle beach club paired with luxury lifestyle resort
At a suitable location in Arambol, Vagator or Anjuna; and Cavelossim or Palolem


Eco-beach (Resort)
Pure Eco-beach: Galgibag, Morjim turtle stretch/ bird watching and Talpona. Resort: Agonda, Patnem, Palolem (part), Morjim, Mandrem and Querim


Marinas
Nauxi, Chicalim and Britonna; Further south e.g.: Assolna



Regeneration/ Upgrading of beaches


Product: Coastal tourism Commercial • Beaches along the coast of Goa will
Flagship program Quick wins strategy provide its resident population, the tourism
industry and tourists with basic services that cater for their needs and requirements.
Implementation • Launch either Calangute Beach to the north strategy or Colva beach in the south as pilot phase to showcase results and create awareness.
The program will implement good practice in these processes and replicate the experience in other beaches.


Key issues to be addressed
• Infrastructure improvements envisaged – beach access, cleaning, maintenance, water, electricity, sewerage, parking
• Regulation, relocation from the beach and upgrade of shacks/ and retail shops.
• Quality labels should be implemented to guarantee a best in class experience to visitors, encouraging repeat visits.
• Misbehaviour from tourists and retail owners: lack of cleanliness at all beaches, and also, high levels of alcohol and drug abuse on certain beaches
 
Timeframe: Short term
Concept and objectives • Coastal tourism is “THE” tourism product Goa is famed for; however, efforts need to be taken to upgrade/ organize the existing product and enhance the tourist experience in an increasingly competitive global coastal tourism scenario. Goa needs to improve its basic infrastructures, particularly in the most developed coastal areas to support the sustainable development of tourism growth.
• It is envisaged that the overall quality of the existing infrastructure is improved to bring it on par with best in class products, with special emphasis laid on innovation, quality, safety and security.
Accommodation needs • The inclusion of high-end music venues or high-end lifestyle beach clubs combined with luxury lifestyle resorts (Ushuaia and Nikki Beach concepts respectively) can raise the quality level in the area and bring other synergies
Market strategy • Tourists (domestic and foreign) and residents
• Day and overnight visitors (including day cruise visitors)



Raising the quality, safety and sanitation level of the most popular beaches







































Summary of strategy
Regeneration/ Up gradation of beaches
Pedestrian and non-motorized access Vehicular access & parking areas Shacks Beach facilities & equipment
 Promenade along the beach front
 Comfortable, safe and efficient pedestrian network with wide sidewalks to access the beach promenade
 Encourage biking by providing bike paths
 Proper access to the beach
 Provision of large open public spaces along the promenade. These will work as “Gathering Places” facilitating social contact and communication, including cultural and commercial activities
 Barrier free access for specially abled persons  The road running parallel to the promenade (sea front) is blocked off from all traffic
 Parking closest to the beach should be the most expensive
 More parking options are available in the surroundings
 Free shuttle bus services available connecting parking to the beach  Shacks set up on the edge of the beach under specific standards and granted as a special license as per the shack policy
 Shacks set up at intervals from each other as specified in the shack policy
 Main concentration of eateries should not be directly on the beach, but behind the road running parallel to the promenade and along the streets converging on the beach subject to land availability
 Give quality labels to best shacks and special Goan cuisine label for those who would like to apply and meet standards  Sitting areas
 Showers
 Changing rooms
 Playgrounds for kids
 Parking for bicycles
 Signage illustrating advanced quality and environmental beach management
 Demarcation of swimming, water sports and no swim zones along the beach
 First aid facilities
Transversal strategies
 Safety: increasing the number of local policemen and building a network video surveillance system with network cameras
 Solid waste management: developing a proper network of collection and disposal of solid waste
 The ultimate goal of the Regeneration/ Up gradation of beaches program is to impact on human behaviour through the built environment. It is expected that the improvement on the overall state of beaches will help reducing misbehaviour from tourists and retail owners, lack of cleanliness, noise, and the high levels of alcohol and drug abuse.


Regeneration/ Up gradation of beaches – example of the different sections could be found on beaches depending on their degree of urbanization

Draft for discuss1ion
Regeneration/ Up gradation of beaches – conceptual example of zones













C
A
B



Shacks





Beach facilities & equipment



Urbanized beaches – assumptions applied in estimating the construction costs for the Program


Non-urbanized (natural) beaches – assumptions applied in estimating the construction costs for the Program


Cost concept 1 kilometre of Promenade along non-urbanized (natural) beaches
Total cost INR 2.78 cr
Facilities • Promenade (light and eco- friendly structure equipped with sitting areas, waste-paper bins and walking paths to access the beach)
• In order to protect marine life and biodiversity, some natural beaches should not be equipped with lighting systems and illumination during the night
• Parking (100 parking lots)
• Beach facilities (solid waste management, showers, toilets, information panels and signage illustrating advanced quality and environmental beach management)



Benchmark and character images








“Best Practices”

• Playa de Palma
• Blue Flag voluntary label (www.blueflag.org)
• Nautical Stations in Spain (www.estacionesnauticas.info)
• Bali: Focus on cleanliness, access and public utilities. To control tourist flow, wall has been developed parallel to main beaches with convenient entry points. Roads are lined with pedestrian walkways which offer a view of the beach. To decongest the traffic near beaches, many roads have a one way access.
• Salou and Cambrils Municipalities, Spain- Since the 19th century, Salou has been a leading tourist destination in Europe, its slogan is “Salou Europe’s beach”. Quality, excellence and respect for the environment are the standards used when working on the Salou coast. All of the municipality’s beaches have been awarded ISO I400I Environmental Certification. Salou and Cambrils are working together with two more neighbouring municipalities in order to achieve its main goal today: reduction in seasonality. With a large leisure offering (which includes Port Aventura World) they have become a reference of family and sports tourist destinations.









Fishermen market and F&B court

Key issues to be addressed
• Identification of at least 2 fishermen ports / markets where the product could be developed: at least one in the South and one in the North of Goa
• Ensure participation of local stakeholders: fishermen, fish market sales shops and food & beverage entrepreneurs, which could be already established ones, willing to replicate their experience in a new location.
• Ensure that Goan cuisine is featured in the product and that good quality is provided in terms of food products, food stands and culinary preparation, cleanliness and maintenance

Draft for discuss2ion
Goa’s number one source of premium fresh seafood and local cuisine

Potential locations Facilities and land requirements
Britona, Chapora Bay, Siridao and Mobor/ Assolna Fishermen port and market (adjacent or nearby); Food & beverage court space (at least 1,000 sq.m.)
Description and tasks
• Identification of the fishing port/ village for carrying out of the pilot test
• Location: The final location has to be well thought out after a thorough study of the terrain, avoiding any damage to existing local and fishing activities.
• Identification and selection of gastronomic offering, which needs to be aligned with the programme to promote the traditional cuisine of Goa throughout the state.
• Make agreements with all interested stakeholders and agree on space & program
• Implementation e.g. Turisme Pesquer activity is a more relaxing alternative to an active fishing tour. It involves departing from the port of Cambrils in a pleasure boat, and sailing to where the fishermen work and cast their trawl nets. From there, they explain the different kinds of fishing tackle and the treasures of the Mediterranean Sea. Then the traveler is taken to a seaside restaurant to enjoy the delights of Cambrils' seafood restaurants, and dishes such as the "ranxo mariner" (sailor's fare)
• Ensure that minimum space is available and design the concept with 2 main options:
• Popular and informal Food Court: one shared public dining room with F&B stands around
• Cluster of specialised fish and shellfish restaurants and/ or shacks with different
sizes and culinary levels
• Certification and quality labels



Benchmark and character images








High-end music venue paired with luxury lifestyle resort


Market strategy • Aimed at domestic and international tourists and visitors
Implementation strategy • The programme will be put into practice in one of the most developed and popular beaches in Goa's northern area, currently dominated by mass tourism. Once the beach is selected, the most appropriate location must be found.
• It is a single project, not to be duplicated
in different locations/ beaches.

Key issues to be addressed
• Selection of the most suitable beach to locate the project. It is expected that this kind of products will increase quality levels in adjacent areas. Other resorts/ events locations, either existing or future, will try to improve their standards to provide the same quality level.
• Once the beach is selected, the precise location must be studied in detail as well as the size of the site needed
• Take into account conditions of access (both pedestrian and vehicular) and the parking supply
• Take into account the conditions of cleanliness, lighting and
security in the vicinity of the club
• Selection of operator / brand

Envisioned to be one of the most exclusive and biggest clubs in India

Draft for discuss3ion







Potential locations Facilities and land requirements
At a suitable location in Baga,
Calangute or Candolim 3 to 4 Ha



Benchmark and character images










High-end lifestyle beach club paired with luxury lifestyle resort



• Selection of the most suitable beach to locate the project. It is expected that this kind of product will help to increase the competitiveness of the destination. Other existing or future resorts/ beach clubs will try to improve their standards to provide the same quality level.
• Most suitable location and site necessary for the development.
• Improve access conditions (both pedestrian and vehicular) and the
parking supply.
• Improve the conditions of cleanliness, lighting and security in the vicinity of the beach club.
• Selection of operator / brand

Draft for discuss4ion
Featuring a blend of music, art and fashion with day and night atmosphere






Benchmark and character images









Eco-beach resort


Market strategy • Domestic and foreign tourists
Implementation strategy • Launch either Galgibag beach or Talpona beach to the south as a pilot project to showcase results and create awareness. The program will implement good practices in this process and stakeholders will be able to replicate the experience in other beaches.

Key issues to be addressed
• There are some beaches that need to be protected from any kind of construction. These zones should be given the status and format of “Marine Nature & Life Parks”
• Eco-beach resorts should include an environmental and social programme in their development
• Low density branded resorts for the high-end market should be promoted (brands such as Banyan Tree, Six Senses, The Oberoi, Como Hotels, etc.)
• Develop eco-tourism standards, which could be totally or mainly inspired in already existing green eco-label
• Green certifications and quality labels for activities/ experiences

Draft for discuss5ion
Built in harmony with nature and hence with minor impact on environment


Potential locations Facilities and land requirements
Pure Eco-beach: Galgibag, Morjim turtle stretch and Talpona. Eco-beach resort: Agonda, Patnem, Palolem (part), Morjim, Mandrem and Querim
1.5 to 3 Ha



Benchmark and character images







Eco-beach Resort
What is an Eco-Resort exactly? Some examples of activities offered
 Low density developments (small sized tourist accommodation structure)
 Often located in special interest and preserved / protected areas (they contribute to the protection of the fragile neighbouring zones)
 Built in harmony with nature and hence with minor impact on environment
 Involves the local communities and allows them to generate benefits
 Financially sustainable
 Offers tourists the opportunity for an interactive experience and proves to be suitable for a spiritual communion between nature and culture
 Eco-Resorts are planned, designed, built and exploited in accordance with responsible environmental and social principles  Nature-based activities
 Walking, cycling, horseback and camel rides
 Exploring the local fauna, flora, bird and insect life around
 Agro-tourism
 Some establishments include organic gardens to supply their restaurants and tourists can even participate in cooking sessions
 Protection and Interpretation Centres
 Learning-by-doing activities (Edutainment) with local communities
 Rural and community activities based on traditional and local products
 Relaxation and recovery activities such as Spa treatments & massages, meditation, yoga
 Incentives, team-building activities
 Water and energy consumption: steps to reduce its carbon footprint must be taken to avoid impacts on the surroundings
 Solid waste management: developing a proper network of collection and disposal of solid waste.



Illustrative conceptual example

As mentioned before, Eco-beach resorts will be located in special interest and/or preserved/ protected areas as they contribute to the protection of the fragile neighbouring zones. The use and management of the surrounding areas might be done under the ‘Eco Nature Park’ approach.

Eco Nature Park


The Eco Nature Park is open to the guests and offers the possibility to discover the local fauna and flora. The park has a scientific and educational purpose, offering to biologists and volunteers an area of study of this eco-system and offering to the public an entertaining way to discover the fauna and flora of the eco-system.
Visitors are able to walk through the park on wood board trails and marked trails. These trails are punctuated by information board that describe the ecosystem of the park.
Trekking, bird watching, diving and other nature activities can be organized.






















BRANDED VILLAS HOTEL



Marinas


Implementati on strategy • At least one marina needs to be developed so as to raise the quality and the standards
• The first marina development is envisioned for the Chapora bay as it is strategically the destination promoted for the yachters’ market. Further marina development along the coast is envisioned to be connected through a network of services and standards
Key issues to be addressed

• Location: Final location has to be well thought out after a thorough study of the terrain and avoid trampling on existing local and fishing activities.
• Development Program: determine the optimum size and the list of components to be included as part of the development
• The development of the marina should be best left to the private industry and stakeholders (Government to be the licensing authority and a catalyst).
• Include an assessment of the general opinion of the initiative and its impact in the media.

Understood as an anchor of a mixed-use development which includes accommodation, retail, F&B and entertainment premises




Potential locations Facilities and land requirements
Nauxi Bay, Chicalim and Britona -



Benchmark and character images





















Coastal Programs – Initial investment concepts

Estimations refer to the costs of building one unit/ facility

Programs cost concept Unit of Cost per Number of Total Cost measure unit (INR) units (INR Cr.) Financial Model
Public Private
1.- Regeneration/ Up gradation of Beaches Urbanized beaches Linear metre 55,667.3 1,000 5.57 100%
Non-urbanized (natural) beaches Linear metre 27,833.7 1,000 2.78 100%
2.- Fishermen Market and F&B Court Fishermen Market Use existing fishermen market
F&B court (core and shell) sq. m. 17,200 1,000 sq. m. 1.72 100%
3.- High-end music venue paired with luxury lifestyle resort
Resort + Venue keys 4,128,600 300 keys 123.86 100%
4.- High-end lifestyle beach club paired with luxury lifestyle resort
Resort + Beach Club keys 3,440,500 250 keys 86 100%
5.- Eco-beach (Resort) Resort keys 2,752,400 55 keys 15.14 100%
Discovery Eco Centre Units 4,816,700 1 unit 0.5 100%

6.- Marina* Berths (including site
Berths 2,408,350 50 12.04
preparation)
100%
Mixed-use development sq. m. 47,135 15,000 Sq. m. 70.7



These costs do not include the cost of land
(*) Investment is subject to specific project conditions and may vary largely depending on location, site preparation, marina construction works and development program

Coastal Programs – Estimated initial investment (phased over the next 10 years)


Coastal Programs Yearly Budget Number of projects Total (INR Cr.)
2018
2019
2020
2021
2022
2023
2024
2025
2026
2027

1.- Regeneration/ Up gradation of Beaches 8 km of urbanized beaches + 22 km of natural beaches
105.8
35.3
35.3
35.3
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
2.- Fishermen Market and F&B Court
3 F&B Courts
5.2
1.7
1.7
1.7
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
3.- High-end music venue paired with luxury lifestyle resort
1 Resort
123.9
0.0
-
61.9
61.9
-
-
-
-
-
-
4.- High-end lifestyle beach club paired with luxury lifestyle resort
1 Resort
86.0
0.0
-
43.0
43.0
-
-
-
-
-
-
5.- Eco-beach (Resort) 3 Resorts 46.9 0.0 - 15.6 15.6 15.6 - - - - -
6.- Marina 1 Marina 82.7 0.0 - 27.6 27.6 27.6 - -
-
-
-
Total Coastal Programs Budget
450.4
37.0
37.0
185.1
148.1
43.2
-
-
-
-
-
(%) 100% 8.21% 8.21% 41.10% 32.89% 9.59% - - - - -

Coastal Programs – Reinvestment (1.5% of estimated initial investment)


Coastal Programs Yearly Budget Number of projects Total (INR Cr.)
2018
2019
2020
2021
2022
2023
2024
2025
2026
2027

1.- Regeneration/ Up gradation of Beaches 8 km of urbanized beaches + 22 km of natural beaches
12.7
-
0.5
1.1
1.6
1.6
1.6
1.6
1.6
1.6
1.6
2.- Fishermen Market and F&B Court
3 F&B Courts
0.6 -
0.0
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
3.- High-end music venue paired with luxury lifestyle resort
1 Resort
11.1
-
-
-
-
1.9
1.9
1.9
1.9
1.9
1.9
4.- High-end lifestyle beach club paired with luxury lifestyle resort
1 Resort
7.7
-
-
-
-
1.3
1.3
1.3
1.3
1.3
1.3
5.- Eco-beach (Resort) 3 Resorts 4.2 - - - 0.2 0.5 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.7
6.- Marina 1 Marina 6.2 - - - - - 1.2 1.2 1.2 1.2 1.2
Total Coastal Programs Budget
42.6
0.0
0.6
1.1
1.9
5.3
6.8
6.8
6.8
6.8
6.8
(%) 100% - 1.30% 2.60% 4.45% 12.39% 15.85% 15.85% 15.85% 15.85% 15.85%

Coastal Programs – Total estimated initial investment + Reinvestment


Coastal Programs Yearly Budget Number of projects Total (INR Cr.)
2018
2019
2020
2021
2022
2023
2024
2025
2026
2027

1.- Regeneration/ Up gradation of Beaches 8 km of urbanized beaches + 22 km of natural beaches
118.5
35.3
35.8
36.3
1.6
1.6
1.6
1.6
1.6
1.6
1.6
2.- Fishermen Market and F&B Court
3 F&B Courts
5.8
1.7
1.7
1.8
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
3.- High-end music venue paired with luxury lifestyle resort
1 Resort
135.0
-
-
61.9
61.9
1.9
1.9
1.9
1.9
1.9
1.9
4.- High-end lifestyle beach club paired with luxury lifestyle resort
1 Resort
93.8
-
-
43.0
43.0
1.3
1.3
1.3
1.3
1.3
1.3
5.- Eco-beach (Resort) 3 Resorts 51.1 - - 15.6 15.9 16.1 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.7
6.- Marina 1 Marina 88.9 - - 27.6 27.6 27.6 1.2 1.2 1.2 1.2 1.2
Total Coastal Programs Budget
493.0
37.0
37.5
186.2
150.0
48.5
6.8
6.8
6.8
6.8
6.8
(%) 100% 7.50% 7.61% 37.77% 30.43% 9.83% 1.37% 1.37% 1.37% 1.37% 1.37%

Coastal Programs – Distribution of total estimated initial investment + Reinvestment


Coastal Budget
Total Distribution by Program

Coastal Budget Public Vs. Private




Marina, 18.0%




Eco-beach (Resort), 10.4%


High-end lifestyle beach club paired with luxury lifestyle resort, 19.0%

Regeneration/ Up gradation of Beaches, 24.0%


Fishermen Market and F&B Court, 1.2%


High-end music venue paired with luxury lifestyle resort, 27.4%

















Private, 74.8%



Public, 25.2%




Total expected cost
(over the next 10 years)
INR 493 Cr.

Coastal Programs – Facility Management Recurrent Expenditures (2% of estimated initial investment)



Coastal Programs Yearly Budget Number of projects Total (INR Cr.)
2018
2019
2020
2021
2022
2023
2024
2025
2026
2027

1.- Regeneration/ Up gradation of Beaches 8 km of urbanized beaches + 22 km of natural beaches
16.9 -
0.7
1.4
2.1
2.1
2.1
2.1
2.1
2.1
2.1
2.- Fishermen Market and F&B Court
3 F&B Courts
0.8
-
0.0
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
3.- High-end music venue paired with luxury lifestyle resort
1 Resort
Not Estimated
4.- High-end lifestyle beach club paired with luxury lifestyle resort
1 Resort
Not Estimated
5.- Eco-beach (Resort) 3 Resorts 0.2 - - - 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
6.- Marina 1 Marina Not Estimated
Total Coastal Programs Budget
17.9
0.0
0.7
1.5
2.2
2.2
2.2
2.2
2.2
2.2
2.2
(%) - 4.13% 8.25% 12.43% 12.49% 12.54% 12.54% 12.54% 12.54% 12.54%
100%


Facility Management Recurrent Expenditures refers to maintenance, cleanliness and security of the facility Private annual recurrent expenses related with Facility Management are not estimated
(*) Refers to the Discovery Eco Centres only



Coastal Programs – Financing Options

Coastal Program Initiatives
Regeneration/ Up gradation of Beaches Fishermen Market and F&B Court High-end music venue paired with luxury lifestyle resort High-end lifestyle beach club paired with luxury lifestyle resort Eco-beach (Resort) Marina
 The State government predominantly would fund this initiative with limited help from private players which could include shack owners and hotels

 The financing could also be done through a BOT model with private hotels, with infrastructure costs borne by the State government  Financing options would include PPP with major F&B player entering into contract with the State government  Financing through private participation with major global hotel chains funding the initiative under complete ownership or with partnerships with major international lifestyle brands  Financing through private participation with major global hotel chains funding the initiative under complete ownership or with partnerships with major international lifestyle brands  Central or state government/ Multilateral agency funding with eco- conservation for development of area

 An alternative financing scheme would be partnerships with CSR department of multinational firms and the State government to foster eco-tourism

 Private participation in financing of individual projects  Predominantly financing through private participation with major tourism players

Coastal Tourism Programs – Summary


Program Flagship program ‘Quick win’ Short term Medium term Long term Public Private Public Private
1- Regeneration/ Up gradation of Beaches



Lead
Support
Lead Service contract
2- Fishermen Market and F&B Court    PPP Support Lead
3- High-end music venue paired with luxury lifestyle resort


Support
Lead
Support
Lead
4- High-end lifestyle beach club paired with luxury lifestyle resort

Support
Lead
Support
Lead
5- Eco-beach (Resort)  Support Lead Support Lead
6- Marinas  Support Lead Support Lead








Short term: within 3 years Medium term: 3 - 5 years Long term: 5 years/ above









Monuments
Key Pilot projects: Old Goa Churches, Mary Immaculate Church, Mangueshi &
Shantadurga Temples, Tambdi Surla, Pansaimol rock carvings, Kurdi templ
Villages (arrive and walk)
Siolim, Sangolda, Divar, Chorao, Pomburpa, Aldona, Chandor, Gaondongri, Rivona,
Naroa


The Goa Multimedia Experience
Old Goa Church Complex/ environs or Kala Academy
Handicrafts
Sale of products via GHRSSIDC (Aparant) in dense tourist locations & online channels



Forts



Key issues to be addressed

• Potential conflicts due to the incompatibility of uses in heritage buildings
• Carrying capacity
• Possible sources of financing
• Stakeholder’s enrolment (tours operators, travel agencies, tour guides, press, local tourism development units, rural exploitations, etc.) in order to create the tourism product


Providing nice visitor journey experience and enhance with complementary such as F&B, retail and events

Potential locations
Forts Reis Magos, Tiracol, Chapora, Aguada and Cabo de Rama

Facilities and land requirements

N/A

Tiracol




Chapora


Pernem
Pernem


Bardez

Mapusa







Bicholim

Bicholim Sattari


Karnataka

Description and tasks
• Aspects to be addressed to improve facilities: transport and infrastructure to access the premises, including specially abled access facilitation, signage, safety, surveillance cameras, first aid kits, public amenities like toilets and cloak rooms, interpretation tools such as panels and information in the premises, use of new


Aguada

Reis Magos






Vasco da Gama



Panaji
Tiswadi

North Goa


Ponda

Sattari

technologies, access to Internet, tourist mobile apps
• Aspects to be addressed to add new facilities: museum/ visitor centre / interpretation centre, restaurant or cafeteria, souvenir shop, toilets, parking area, boutique hotel accommodation, sufficient illumination

Mormugao






Arabian Sea

Ponda


Margao
Salcette









Quepem

Dharbandora
Dharbandora



Sanguem
Sanguem

• Funding can be procured through national/ regional funds programmes, along with innovative financing methods like corporate CSR
• Aspects related with operational guidelines: develop code of conduct for visitors, tourists, employees and residents, providing guidelines, develop maintenance plans and schedules for cleanliness and safety in order to enhance preservation, tour guide regulations, collaborate with respective Govt. depts, among others



Cabo de Rama

South Goa
Quepem

Chaudi
Canacona

• Actions linked to the holding of events: programming a schedule of cultural events (weekly / monthly) on the fort premises, scheduling of talks or conferences with academics or historians
• Actions associated to the enhancement of the forts network (if applicable): recovery and development of old communication routes between forts for tourism purposes, improve accessibility, improve basic tourist infrastructures associated to the route, provide bus services, develop points of interest



Benchmark and character images




Draft for discuss2ion
Monuments (Temples, Churches, Museums & other Archaeological sites)


Commercial
strategy • Beaches along the coast of Goa will provide its resident population, the tourism industry and tourists with basic services that cater for their needs and requirements.
Implementati on strategy • Launch Old Goa Church Complex as pilot project to showcase results and create awareness.
• The program will implement good practices in these processes and replicate the experience in other assets.

Key issues to be addressed

• Potential conflicts due to the incompatibility of uses in heritage buildings
• Carrying capacity
• Possible sources of financing
• Stakeholder’s enrolment (tours operators, travel agencies, tour guides, press, local tourism development units, rural exploitations, etc.) in order to create the tourism product

Key area for improvement: Maintenance and development of assets and supporting infrastructure




Benchmark and character images





Spain – as many other countries in Europe and America – has several examples of mining sites that have been converted into tourist attractions where tourists and visitors are able to see and experience the present or historic heritage extraction processes

• The Mining and Industry Museum of Asturias (MUMI), founded by the Principado de Asturias and Caja de Asturias, pays tribute to coal mining, an activity that has determined the social and industrial situation of Asturias for two centuries.
• Throughout the different sections of the Mining and Industry Museum of Asturias, visitors can explore various old machines that were used in European mining before the steam and industrial revolution occurred, as well as the explosives used to extract the minerals
• Visitors can also experience what it’s like to be in a mine and learn about the different systems used to obtain coal by using the ‘cage’ (the miners lift) which will take them down to the mine
• A walk around the museum lets tourists understand various scientific instruments used in the scientific and industrial development of the society, mining hospitals, electrical work, minerals and fossils

• 2 hours 30 minutes

Source: http://www.mumi.es/media/Default%20Files/MUMI/MUMIEN/index.html




• The permanent exhibition is divided into 2 spaces: coal, its mining, the importance of coal infrastructures, transport and its previous screening before use, both as home and industrial fuel and as primary source to produce electricity.
• The new exhibition, “The Spectacle of the Mine”, foster the understanding of the two types of mining developments in use nowadays: underground and opencast mining.
• The museography as it is planned aims at taking the visitor into a history narrated from the future. From here visitors will rediscover the world of mines through projections, holograms and innovative image and sound effects.
• At the end the workers' housing can be seen. The visit is completed by the viewing of an audio-visual based on the Alt Berguedà mining area and the guided visit into the inside of the mine where working conditions through time are to be analysed.

• 1 hour 30 minutes

Source: http://www.mmcercs.cat/en/museum



Villages (arrive and walk around)


Key issues to be addressed

• Draft legislation to architecturally regulate façades &
finishing of buildings
• Specific architectural and colour identity (as in every famous tourist destination) – there is need to control and restrict the design and colours of existing and new buildings and houses.
• Possible sources of financing
• Goa has already had a successful experience (the Fontainhas case) in the restoration of heritage buildings and this could be studied and included as a ‘best practice’.
• Quality labels should be implemented to guarantee a best in class experience to visitors, thus encouraging repeat visits.



Highlighting authentic features while providing multi-experience

Potential locations Facilities and land requirements
Siolim, Sangolda, Divar, Chorao, Pomburpa, Aldona, Chandor, Gaondongrim, Rivona
N/A



Benchmark and character images








Old Goan houses


Implementati on strategy • Launch of a pilot test with a relatively small number of properties, preferably those which are in best condition at present. Provide assistance plans for restoration and maintenance and carry out promotion by the inclusion of the structures in an itinerary (providing GPS location mapping).

Key issues to be addressed

• Potential conflicts due to the incompatibility of uses in heritage buildings
• Possible sources of financing
• Goa has already had a successful experience (the Fontainhas case) in the restoration of heritage buildings and this could be studied and included as a ‘best practice’
• Draft legislation for the protection of this type of asset
• Quality labels should be implemented to guarantee a best in class experience to visitors, thus encouraging repeat visits.
• Public Private Partnerships


Designed to stir the imagination and allow history lovers to stay in some of the most historic buildings




Potential locations Facilities and land requirements
Panaji-Fontainhas, Aldona, Siolim, Colvale, Chandor, Curtorim, Raia, Sanguem
N/A

Description and tasks
• Establish a list including both Portuguese and Hindu influence
• Identify those well kept and list for initial promotion providing GPS location and mapping
• Provide restoration and maintenance schemes
• Encourage innovative financing methods, e.g. The Vallès Oriental county comprises 39 municipalities and work on three main lines: communication and promotion, quality and training, and support to the municipalities and the tourism enterprises. Little villages received funds for tourism projects from the European Commission through the counties.
• Encourage heritage walks
• Include them in themed circuits and encourage complementary use for shops, arts, Food & Beverage; accommodation (homestays and Bed & Breakfast)



Benchmark and character images





Culinary


Implementati on strategy • Launch of a pilot project that includes the creation of a training centre for the teaching and learning of the cooking methods and techniques for typical dishes of Goa cuisine.
• Additionally, it should include the creation of a space where visitors can get to know and can try local products and dishes. This initiative could be associated with the “Fisherman Market and F&B Court” program (see Coastal programs)
Key issues to be addressed
• Preparation of a list, agreed on by a panel of experts, of the dishes – as well as their preparation – that make up the cuisine of Goa
• Showcasing of these Goan dishes and F&B products throughout the Goa State.
• Effective promotion and recognition of this cuisine to and by tourists, visitors and local residents

Draft for discuss5ion
Goan food and drinks: reviving traditional receipts paired with modern creation






Beach Shacks

Riverside Promenade
Pernem
Pernem


Bardez










Bicholim

Culinary tourism in homestays, house visits and spice villages/ farms


Potential locations Facilities and land requirements
Across Goa N/A
Description and tasks
• Identify, define and revive authentic Goan food and drinks – experts panel –

Restaurants

Mapusa

Bicholim Sattari

popular and gastronomic cuisine

e.g. Spice Goa Riverside Promenade
Agro farms
e.g. Yogi Farms

Spice Farms e.g. Sahakari spice farm


Panjim
Tiswadi

Vasco da Gama
Mormugao

North Goa


Ponda

Ponda



Margaon
Salcette

Sattari





Dharbandora
Dharbandora




Sanguem

• Identify and promote shacks and restaurants that offer authentic Goan cuisine
through special label
• Culinary approach should not be focused only on traditional food but also on creativity process for modern Goan cuisine, using local food & beverage products and different influences
• Goan cuisine could be a blend of popular food paired with gastronomic approach
• Enhance special culinary events on a weekly, monthly and yearly basis
• Goa Food and Cultural Festival should focus more on Goan products and cuisine,


Farmers markets

Quepem

South Goa

Quepem

Chaudi
Canacona

Sanguem

though not necessarily exclusively
• Spice farms could also paly a role and provide culinary experiences with a taste of Goan food using different kind of spices.
• Marketing and distribution of local produce like Feni and Wine needs scaling up
• Development of cashew trails, wine circuits and cooking lessons to promote
culinary tastes of goa
• Enhance food markets paired with specialized/ themed food courts



Benchmark and character images






Cultural events



Key issues to be addressed

• Reinforce existing events
• Create a variety of events appealing for different types of public
• Ensure that some events take place in the hinterlands
• Ensure funding for their preparation and celebration
• Ensure long term sustainability of successful events

Draft for discuss6ion
Featuring a blend of music, art and fashion with day and night atmosphere




Potential locations Facilities and land requirements
Old Goa, Panaji-Fontainhas, Adil Shah Palace, Church square and different locations on the coast and more importantly in the hinterlands

N/A



Benchmark and character images




The Goa Multimedia Experience


Implementati on strategy • A place among the potential options is selected and the first version of the show is launched. It is then updated as the new product and experience offering is developed.
• It is a single project, not to be duplicated in different locations/ beaches.


Key issues to be addressed

• Selection of the most suitable place to locate the project
• Take into account conditions of access (both pedestrian and vehicles) and the parking supply

Accommodati on needs • Not linked to a specific accommodation offering

Market
strategy • Tourists (domestic and foreign) and resident population
• Day and overnight visitors (including day cruise visitors)
Commercial strategy • The Goa Multimedia Experience show will allow visitors to appreciate the idiosyncrasy of the places and the peoples of the state. It will be possible to learn the history behind many of Goa's towns, monuments and traditions.



A showcase of all the experiences available to tourists visiting Goa




Potential locations Facilities and land requirements
Old Goa Church Complex/ environs
or Kala Academy 0.5 to 1 Ha in case of building a new
facility



Benchmark and character images
















Handicrafts



Key issues to be addressed

• Promotion of authentic Goa handcrafts, as well as their traditional production techniques and methods
• Involvement of the local communities in the programme
• Goa has its Goa Chitra Ethnographic Museum, which
could be a reference for “best practices”



Creation of a real showcase of Goan hand-made items






Benchmark and character images
















Culture & Heritage Programs – Initial investment concepts

Estimations refer to the costs of building one unit/ facility

Programs cost concept Unit of Cost per Number of Total Cost measure unit (INR) units (INR Cr.) Financial Model
Public Private
1.- Forts Adaptation for tourism use + 20,643,000 2.4 100% basic facilities: Welcome centre,
ticketing, souvenir shop, F&B Lump sum N/A
outlet, toilets, parking, 34,400,000 3.44 100% signposting within premises, etc.

2.- Monuments
3.- Villages (arrive and walk) Adaptation for tourism use Lump sum 55,048,000 N/A 5.5 100%
4.- Old Goan Houses Restoration and maintenance Lump sum 1,032,150 N/A 0.1 50% 50%
5.- Culinary Goan Culinary World Centre* sq. m. 47,135 2,000 sq. m. 9.43 100%
6.- Cultural Events N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
7.- The Goa Multimedia Experience Theatre facility + Production of
Lump sum 206,430,000 N/A 20.6 100%
multimedia film
8.- Handicrafts Goan Handicraft World Centre sq. m. 47,135 2,000 sq. m. 9.43
100%
Network of specialized shops** shop 1,720,250 5 0.86





These costs do not include the cost of land
(*) Similar to the Fishermen Market and F&B Court, this is a place for showcasing, learning, tasting and selling of Food & Beverage products (**) At least 5 shops located in busy places such as the airport, city centre, main train stations, shopping streets, etc.

Culture & Heritage Programs – Estimated initial investment (phased over the next 10 years)



C&H Programs Yearly Budget Number of projects Total (INR Cr.)
2018
2019
2020
2021
2022
2023
2024
2025
2026
2027
1.- Forts 6 Forts 14.5 4.8 4.8 4.8 - - - - - - -
2.- Monuments 7 Sites/
Monuments 24.1 8.0 8.0 8.0 - - - - - - -
3.- Villages (arrive and
walk)
7 Villages
38.5
12.8
12.8
12.8
-
-
-
-
-
4.- Old Goan Houses 50 Heritage houses 5.2 1.7 1.7 1.7 - - - - - - -
5.- Culinary 2 Goan Culinary
World Centres 18.9 - 9.4 9.4 - - - - - - -
6.- Cultural Events N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
7.- The Goa Multimedia Experience
1 Facility
20.6
-
-
10.3
10.3
-
-
-
-
-
-
8.- Handicrafts 1 Goan Handicraft
World 9.4 - - 4.7 4.7 - - - - - -
Total C&H Programs Budget
131
15
24
52
28
13
-
-
-
-
-
(%) 100% 11.11% 18.29% 39.55% 21.26% 9.79% - - - - -

Culture & Heritage Programs – Reinvestment (1.5% of estimated initial investment)


C&H Programs Yearly Budget Number of projects Total (INR Cr.)
2018
2019
2020
2021
2022
2023
2024
2025
2026
2027
1.- Forts 6 Forts 1.7 - 0.1 0.1 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2
2.- Monuments 7 Sites/
Monuments 2.9 - 0.1 0.2 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4
3.- Villages (arrive and walk)
7 Villages
3.5
-
-
-
0.2
0.4
0.6
0.6
0.6
0.6
0.6
4.- Old Goan Houses 50 Heritage houses 0.6 - 0.0 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1
5.- Culinary 2 Goan Culinary
World Centres 2.0 - - - 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3
6.- Cultural Events N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
7.- The Goa Multimedia Experience
1 Facility
1.9
-
-
-
-
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.3
8.- Handicrafts 1 Goan Handicraft
World 0.8 - - - - 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1
Total C&H Programs Budget
13.4
-
0.2
0.4
1.1
1.8
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
(%) 100% - 1.63% 3.26% 8.44% 13.25% 14.68% 14.68% 14.68% 14.68% 14.68%



C&H Programs Yearly Budget Number of projects Total (INR cr.)
2018
2019
2020
2021
2022
2023
2024
2025
2026
2027
1.- Forts 6 Forts
16.2
4.8
4.9
5.0
0.2
0.2
0.2
0.2
0.2
0.2
0.2
2.- Monuments 7 Sites/
Monuments
27.0
8.0
8.1
8.3
0.4
0.4
0.4
0.4
0.4
0.4
0.4
3.- Villages (arrive and walk)
7 Villages
42.0
-
-
12.8
13.0
13.2
0.6
0.6
0.6
0.6
0.6
4.- Old Goan Houses 50 Heritage houses
5.8
1.7
1.7
1.8
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
5.- Culinary 2 Goan Culinary
World Centres
20.8
-
9.4
9.4
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.3
6.- Cultural Events N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
7.- The Goa Multimedia Experience
1 Facility

22.5

-

-

10.3

10.3

0.3

0.3

0.3

0.3

0.3

0.3
8.- Handicrafts 1 Goan Handicraft
World
10.3
-
-
4.7
4.7
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
Total C&H Programs Budget
144.5
14.6
24.2
52.3
29.0
14.6
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
(%) 100% 10.08% 16.75% 36.19% 20.07% 10.11% 1.36% 1.36% 1.36% 1.36% 1.36%



Culture & Heritage Budget Total Distribution by Program
Handicrafts,

Culture & Heritage Budget Public Vs. Private

Private, 2.0%

The Goa Multimedia Experience, 15.4%

7.0%

Forts, 11.2%


Monuments, 18.7%



Culinary, 14.5%




Old Goan Houses, 4.0%


Villages, 29.1%



Public, 98.0%




Total expected cost
(over the next 10 years)
INR 144.5 Cr.

Culture & Heritage Programs – Facility Management Recurrent Expenditures (2% of estimated initial investment)


C&H Programs Yearly Number of Total (INR 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 2027
Budget projects Cr.)
1.- Forts 6 Forts 2.3 - 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3
2.- Monuments 7 Sites/
Monuments 3.9 - 0.2 0.3 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5
3.- Villages (arrive and walk)
7 Villages
4.6
-
-
-
0.3
0.5
0.8
0.8
0.8
0.8
0.8
4.- Old Goan Houses N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A


5.- Culinary 2 Goan Culinary World Centres + 1 Big Annual
Culinary Event

6.1

0.3

0.3

0.3

0.7

0.7

0.7

0.7

0.7

0.7

0.7
6.- Cultural Events Lump Sum 3.4 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3
7.- The Goa Multimedia Experience
1 Facility
2.5
-
-
-
-
0.4
0.4
0.4
0.4
0.4
0.4
8.- Handicrafts 1 Goan Handicraft
World + 5 shops 6.3 - - - - 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0
Total C&H Programs Budget
29.1
0.7
0.9
1.2
2.1
3.8
4.1
4.1
4.1
4.1
4.1
(%) 100% 2.37% 3.25% 4.13% 7.20% 13.11% 13.99% 13.99% 13.99% 13.99% 13.99%

Facility Management Recurrent Expenditures refers to maintenance, cleanliness and security of the facility Private annual recurrent expenses related with Facility Management are not estimated

Culture & Heritage Programs – Financing Options
Culture & Heritage Program Initiatives

Forts and monuments Villages (arrive and walk) and old Goan houses Culinary Cultural Events Goa Multimedia Experience
Handicrafts
 The proposed financing method would be through Central government and state government schemes

 Funding opportunities can also be explored through promotion support and joint ventures with private brands  Private participation in financing

 Financing could be explored through support from CSR initiatives of multinational corporations along with government schemes for development of area

 Funding support can also be explored through hotel chains and multilateral organisations for developing model tourist experience villages  Private participation in financing

 Funding would be potentially obtained through investments from restaurants and global / national food chains

 State government joint venture with local food chains to develop the unique Goan food destination  Government funding with support from private parties depending on nature of event  Investments through private parties with support from State government


 Funding through experience lifestyle chains to develop the Goan cultural multimedia experience in the selected locations  State and Central government funding support through SME funding schemes


 State joint ventures with leading e- commerce ventures to provide funds and provide online commerce infrastructure support

Culture & Heritage Programs – Summary



Program Flagship program ‘Quick win’ Short term Medium term Long term Public Private Public Private

1.- Forts



Lead
-
Lead Service contract

2.- Monuments



Lead
-
Lead Service contract
3.- Villages (arrive and walk)   PPP Support Lead
4.- Old Goan Houses   PPP Support Lead
5.- Culinary   Support Lead Support Lead
6.- Cultural Events   PPP PPP

7.- The Goa Multimedia Experience


Lead
-
- Service
contract
8.- Handicrafts  PPP Support Lead



Short term: within 3 years Medium term: 3 - 5 years Long term: 5 years/ above








Discovery River Cruises (EF)
Rivers Mandovi, Zuari, Sal and Chapora; Cumbarjua Canal



Agro tourism (spice farms/ homestays and agro farms)
In the areas of Molem, Ponda outskirts, Netravali and Quepem



Nature Sanctuaries (EF)
Bondla, Bhagvan Mahaveer, Netravali, Cotigao, Molem National Park and Dr. Salim Ali
Bird Sanctuary
‘Slow Movement’ Wellness Centres
Divar; Also mainly around the hinterland under certified eco-friendly accommodation


Nature Clusters (EF)
4 main clusters: one in each of the hinterland talukas: Satari, Dharbandora,
Sanguem and Canacon

Adventure & Sports Tourism
Bogmalo – Grande Island and its environs; Majorda for water based sports; Dudhsagar Base Camp and Vagueri hills Base Camp



Discovery river cruises

• River cruises are as the most attractive way of discovering the different places, landscapes and peoples of the interior of Goa. There are various alternatives to visit the tourist attractions, from short journeys of a couple of hours to journeys lasting one to two days, with the possibility of staying overnight on the boat.
• Launch the rivers Mandovi, Zuari and Chapora – and the Cumbarjua Canal – as pilot phase to showcase results and raise awareness. The programme will implement good practices in the process and will replicate the experience along other major navigable rivers in Goa.

Key issues to be addressed
• Review of the CRZ Regulations to facilitate growth of tourism on
the banks of rivers.
• Review of the ‘No Development Zones’ to facilitate development of existing jetties with minimum infrastructure for tourism activities (extending up to 100m from the river banks or the width of the river.
• Unparalleled growth of Mangroves in private paddy fields beyond the banks of the rivers is another issue that needs to be attended.
• Address the potential environmental impacts associated with the
development of the programme
• Public-Private Partnerships

Discovering the destination in a relaxed manner on a vessel taking in the lush greens, calm waters and varied fauna








Benchmark and character images







Agro tourism (spice farms/ homestays and agro farms)


Commercial strategy • For those seeking for truly authentic touristic experiences, those who want to be integrated in the local community, going to villages, seeing how people live, share meals with them, better understand their culture
Implementat ion strategy • Progressive implementation across the territory starting with the adaptation and improvement of those tourism products that are currently being exploited in Goa. In a next phase, the programme will continue with the development and adaptation of assets that are lesser known or whose potential is to be realised.
Key issues to be addressed
• There is no an adequate policy for farm land tourism. Current laws are restrictive with regard to development of tourism activities in farm or orchard lands.
• The present regulation and Act should be replaced by a more proactive and practical one.
• Licenses for the touristic exploitation of the attractions
• Quality standards and certifications
• Tourist guide training programmes
• Support in the promotion


Offering the real life of the Goans to those tourists who are eager to discover their culture




Potential locations Facilities and land requirements
In the areas of Molem, Ponda
outskirts, Netravali and Quepem -



Benchmark and character images





Nature Sanctuaries


Key issues to be addressed
• Consultation and agreement with the entity in charge of sanctuaries
• Identify best international and national best practices
• Integrated approach to include benefits for local stakeholders
• Ensure funding for these initiatives

Draft for discuss3ion
Based around local fauna/ flora with an orientation towards environmental promotion






Benchmark and character images














Key issues to be addressed

• Differentiate Goa from other tourism destinations in India and other international competitors.

Market strategy • Mainly domestic and foreign tourists
• Day and overnight visitors (including day cruise visitors)



The “Slow Movement “Culture concept applied to Wellness in Goa

The slow movement advocates a cultural shift toward slowing down life's pace. It began in 1986. Over time, this developed into a subculture in other areas, like the Cittaslow organisation for "slow cities". The "slow“ epithet has subsequently been applied to a variety of activities and aspects of culture.
Geir Berthelsen and his creation of The World Institute of Slowness presented a vision in 1999 for an entire "slow planet" and a need to teach the world the way of slowness. Carl Honoré's 2004 book, In Praise of Slowness, first explored how the Slow philosophy might be applied in every field of human endeavour and coined the phrase "slow movement". The Financial Times said the book is "to the Slow Movement
what Das Kapital is to communism Honoré describes the Slow Movement thus:
"It is a cultural revolution against the notion that faster is always better. The Slow philosophy is not about doing everything at a snail's pace. It's about seeking to do everything at the right speed. Savoring the hours and minutes rather than just counting them. Doing everything as well as possible, instead of as fast as possible. It’s about quality over quantity in everything from work to food to parenting.“
Professor Guttorm Fløistad summarises the philosophy, stating:
"The only thing for certain is that everything changes. The rate of change increases. If you want to hang on you better speed up. That is the message of today. It could however be useful to remind everyone that our basic needs never change. The need to be seen and appreciated! It is the need to belong. The need for nearness and care, and for a little love! This is given only through slowness in human relations. In order to master changes, we have to recover slowness, reflection and togetherness. There we will find real renewal."[
The slow movement is not organised and controlled by a single organisation. A fundamental characteristic of the slow movement is that it is propounded, and its momentum maintained, by individuals who constitute the expanding global community of Slow. Its popularity has grown considerably since the rise of slow food and Cittaslow in Europe, with slowness initiatives spreading as far as Australia and Japan.

Goa’s lifestyle – “susegad” – paired with existing wellness centres that offer treatments which philosophy matches the Slow Movement” culture, creates a framework under which a Goa’s Wellness concept could be included.
The concept is broad enough to include many of the traditional Indian therapies such as Ayurveda, Yoga and others; as well as any other treatments. And it would help position Goa.

Draft for discuss4ion
Wellness destination centers: Focus on new development in the hinterlands





Benchmark and character images




Nature clusters

Product: Nature-based tourism
Flagship programme Quick wins

Timeframe: Medium term
Concept and objectives • It is a concept that arises from combining one or various key assets with other natural or cultural attractions located nearby. The clustering of assets contributes to increasing its attractiveness, generating more visits and delaying the time of the visits.
• The accommodation offering gives visitors the opportunity to stay overnight in the area
• The cluster will be characterised by maintaining a set of shared services.



Market strategy • Tourists (domestic and foreign) and resident population
• Day and overnight visitors (including day cruise visitors)
Commercial strategy • Programme that helps improve the tourist experience at the destination through the offering (as a complement to coastal tourism) of a 2 or 3 day break to discover the biodiversity of an inner area that remains unspoiled







Implementation strategy • Launch pilot cluster with base in Molem village (Satari) and the combination of: Bhagwan Mahaveer Sanctuary, Dudhsagar waterfalls, Tambdi Surla Temple, Atreya Vedic Spice Farm – and add one man- made attraction (i.e. Forest Adventure Park for families).
• After the pilot phase the programme will implement good practices in the processes and will replicate the experience in other talukas.
Key issues to be addressed
• Alignment with the regional plan. Present laws which restrict construction of hotels in orchard and agricultural land should be revised and adapted for specific high interest projects. Though it is necessary to protect the hinterland from over exploitation, any limited exploitation that is permitted should allow the investor, under specific standards, to create a world class facility and not a ramshackle hut or a tent, where tourists feel unwelcome.
• Improvement of the key assets, as well as of other natural or cultural assets that are part of the cluster
• Labels and quality certifications
• Ecotourism goes one step further and contributes to reduce the
negative impacts of tourism by developing products, activities and facilities that safeguard and enhance local environments, biodiversity and culture.


Nature-based hubs located in the hinterland comprising nature and culture assets, man-made attractions and accommodation


Potential locations Facilities and land requirements
4 main clusters: one in each of the hinterland talukas: Sattari, Dharbandora, Sanguem and Canacona
Specified in subsequent slides



Nature Cluster – Pilot project zoom in




Pilot project description


The Pilot project will have its base in Molem Village since it has an accommodation offer today (e.g.
Dudhsagar Spa Resort) and includes a mix of nature, culture and entertainment based activities and attractions.
Visits to this cluster could still be made on a Day Trip basic, however the concept is to generate enough activities for 2 – 3 days visits which at the same time gives the opportunity for accommodation.


The cluster will be characterised by maintaining a set of shared services.



Benchmark and character images



Product: Nature-based tourism
Flagship programme Quick wins

Timeframe: short term











Key issues to be addressed

• Review of the Tourist Trade Act 1982, which was deemed inadequate to deal with various situations that have arisen
– consider the need to amend or replace in consultation with the tourism stakeholders.
• Address the potential environmental impacts associated with the development of the program - since these types of tourism activities and experiences might cause greater territorial impacts, the proposal is that these activities would have to be developed in areas of lower
environmental value.





Pernem Karnataka
Pernem

Bardez Bicholim
Mapusa Bicholim Sattari
North Goa Sattari
Panaji
Tiswadi
Dudhsagar
Vasco da Gama Ponda Base Camp
Mormugao Dharbandora
Ponda Dharbandora
malo –
de Island Margao
Salcette
Majorda beach Sanguem
Quepem Sanguem
Arabian Sea
South Goa
Quepem

Chaudi
Canacona Potential locations Facilities and land requirements
Pilot projects: Bogmalo – Grande Island and its environs for scuba diving; Majorda for water based sports; Dudhsagar Base Camp and Vagueri hills Base Camp; Selaulim, Amthane and Anjunem dams

N/A
Description and tasks
• Determine the list of adventure and sports tourism that are present or could be developed in Goa. Prepare and activity calendar specifying key annual events.
• Establish minimum safety and general operations standards for each type of practice
• Provide certification labels for both companies and individuals (guides and monitors)
• Creation of signposted and secured trekking routes in the mountains like ‘Hiking Trails’ in Europe. Developing of a network of hiking and biking trails in each main hinterland taluka using picturesque landscapes and interesting nature sports.
• Creation of cycle trails near selected rivers (Mandovi, Zuari, Chapora) to discover natural and cultural aspects of the hinterland. Cycle trails can also be developed within nature parks and sanctuaries (optional).
• Development of nature sport trails for mountain bikes, quads, motorbikes, etc. in order to develop the practice and contain environmental impacts. Identify the most degraded areas in order to develop bike & enduro parks (optional).
• Promotion of scuba diving in Goa emphasizing safety standards
• Creation of standards and training of guides emphasizing safety issues




Benchmark and character images















Draft for discussion
Nature Based Programs – Initial investment concepts

Estimations refer to the costs of building one unit/ facility

Programs cost concept Unit of Cost per Number of Total Cost measure unit (INR) units (INR Cr.) Financial Model
Public Private
1.- Discovery River Cruises (EF) Network of stops (jetties and
Jetties/ Port 68,810,000 1 6.88 100%
small ports for cruise ships
2.- Agrotourism (Spice farms and homestays and walks in agro farms) Improvement of Farms Lump sum 1,720,250 N/A 0.17 50% 50%

Improvement of Homestays Lump sum 1,032,150 N/A 0.1 50% 50%


3.- Nature Sanctuaries (EF) Adaptation for tourism use + basic facilities: Welcome centre,
ticketing, souvenir shop, F&B Lump sum 4,128,600 N/A 0.4 100%
outlet, toilets, parking,
signposting within premises, etc.
4.- ‘Slow Movement’ Wellness Centres
Resort/ Centre Keys 2,752,400 50 13,76 100%

5.- Nature Cluster (EF) Adaptation for tourism use and
improvement of key assets that Lump sum 55,048,000 N/A 5.5 100% form part of the cluster
6.- Adventure & Sports Tourism Man-made multisport
Unit 206,430,000 1 20.64 100%
destination/ Adventure Park*
These costs do not include the cost of land
(*) Investment is subject to specific project conditions and may vary largely depending on location, site preparation, park construction works and development program

Nature Based Programs – Estimated initial investment (phased over the next 10
years)


N-B Programs Yearly Budget Number of projects Total (INR Cr.)
2018
2019
2020
2021
2022
2023
2024
2025
2026
2027
1.- Discovery River Cruises (EF) 5 Jetties/ Small ports
34.4
17.2
17.2
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
2.- Agrotourism (Spice farms and homestays and walks in agro farms)
10 Farms + 1,000 homestays

104.9

35.0

35.0

35.0

-

-

-

-

-

-

-
3.- Nature Sanctuaries (EF) 6 Nature Sanctuaries
2.5
0.8
0.8
0.8
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
4.- ‘Slow Movement’ Wellness Centres
5 Resorts/ Centres
68.8
22.9
22.9
22.9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
5.- Nature Cluster (EF) 4 Clusters
22.0
-
-
7.3
7.3
7.3
-
-
-
-
-
6.- Adventure & Sports Tourism
1 Man-made park
20.6
10.3
10.3
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Total N-B Programs Budget
253.3
86.3
86.3
66.1
7.3
7.3
-
-
-
-
-

(%) 100% 34.06% 34.06% 26.09% 2.90% 2.90% - - - - -


Nature Based Programs – Reinvestment (1.5% of estimated initial investment)


N-B Programs Yearly Budget Number of projects Total (INR Cr.)
2018
2019
2020
2021
2022
2023
2024
2025
2026
2027
1.- Discovery River Cruises (EF) 5 Jetties/ Small ports
4.1
-
-
0.5
0.5
0.5
0.5
0.5
0.5
0.5
0.5
2.- Agrotourism (Spice farms and homestays and walks in agro farms)
10 Farms + 1,000 homestays

12.6

-

0.5

1.0

1.6

1.6

1.6

1.6

1.6

1.6

1.6
3.- Nature Sanctuaries (EF) 6 Nature Sanctuaries
0.3
-
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
4.- ‘Slow Movement’ Wellness Centres
5 Resorts/ Centres
8.3
-
0.3
0.7
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
5.- Nature Cluster (EF) 4 Clusters 2.0 - - - 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3
6.- Adventure & Sports Tourism
1 Man-made park
2.5
-
-
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.3
Total N-B Programs Budget
29.7
-
0.9
2.6
3.6
3.7
3.8
3.8
3.8
3.8
3.8
(%) 100% 100% - 2.96% 8.70% 12.04% 12.41% 12.78% 12.78% 12.78% 12.78%



N-B Programs Yearly Budget Number of projects Total (INR Cr.)
2018
2019
2020
2021
2022
2023
2024
2025
2026
2027
1.- Discovery River Cruises (EF) 5 Jetties/ Small ports
38.5
17.2
17.2
0.5
0.5
0.5
0.5
0.5
0.5
0.5
0.5
2.- Agrotourism (Spice farms and homestays and walks in agro farms)
10 Farms + 1,000 homestays

117.5

35.0

35.5

36.0

1.6

1.6

1.6

1.6

1.6

1.6

1.6
3.- Nature Sanctuaries (EF) 6 Nature Sanctuaries
2.8
0.8
0.8
0.9
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
4.- ‘Slow Movement’ Wellness Centres
5 Resorts/ Centres
77.1
22.9
23.3
23.6
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
5.- Nature Cluster (EF) 4 Clusters 24.0 - - 7.3 7.4 7.6 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3
6.- Adventure & Sports Tourism
1 Man-made park
23.1
10.3
10.3
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.3
Total N-B Programs Budget

283.0

86.3

87.1

68.7

10.9

11.0

3.8

3.8

3.8

3.8

3.8
(%) 100% 30.48% 30.79% 24.26% 3.86% 3.90% 1.34% 1.34% 1.34% 1.34% 1.34%



Nature-based Budget Total Distribution by Program

Adventure & Sports




Discovery

Nature-based Budget Public Vs. Private

Tourism, 8.2%

Nature Cluster (EF), 8.5%

River Cruises
(EF), 13.6%


Public, 43.8%



‘Slow Movement’ Wellness Centres, 27.2%








Nature Sanctuaries (EF), 1.0%



Agrotourism (Spice farms and homestays and walks in agro farms), 41.5%


Private, 56.2%




Total expected cost
(over the next 10 years)
INR 283 Cr.

Nature Based Programs – Facility Management Recurrent Expenditures (2% of estimated initial investment)



N-B Programs Yearly Budget Number of projects Total (INR Cr.)
2018
2019
2020
2021
2022
2023
2024
2025
2026
2027
1.- Discovery River Cruises (EF) 5 Jetties/ Small ports
5.5
- -
0.7
0.7
0.7
0.7
0.7
0.7
0.7
0.7
2.- Agrotourism (Spice farms and homestays and walks in agro farms)

10 Farms
Not Estimated
3.- Nature Sanctuaries (EF) 6 Nature Sanctuaries
0.4
-
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
4.- ‘Slow Movement’ Wellness Centres
5 Resorts/ Centres Not
Estimated
5.- Nature Cluster (EF) 4 Clusters 2.6 - - - 0.1 0.3 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4
6.- Adventure & Sports Tourism
1 Man-made park Not Estimated
Total N-B Programs Budget
8.5
-
-
0.7
0.9
1.0
1.2
1.2
1.2
1.2
1.2
(%) 100% - 0.19% 8.44% 10.35% 12.07% 13.79% 13.79% 13.79% 13.79% 13.79%

Facility Management Recurrent Expenditures refers to maintenance, cleanliness and security of the facility Private annual recurrent expenses related with Facility Management are not estimated

Nature Based Programs – Financing Options

Nature Based Program Initiatives
Discovery River Cruises (EF) Agro tourism (spice farms/ homestays and agro farms) Nature Sanctuaries (EF) Slow Movement’ Wellness Centers Nature Clusters (EF) Adventure & Sports Tourism
 State and Central government support for development of rivers


 Private participation in financing of individual projects  State and Central government support for development of area

 Private participation in financing of individual projects  Central government support for funding

 Private participation in financing of individual projects  State government funding for development of the hinterland

 Private participation in financing of individual projects  State government support for funding


 Central government support  PPP funding through the BOOT model

 Private participation in financing of individual projects
 Funding support can also be attained through hotel chains and multilateral organizations for developing model tourist experience destinations

Nature Based Programs – Summary


Program Flagship program ‘Quick win’ Short term Medium term Long term Public Private Public Private
1.- Discovery River Cruises (EF)    PPP Support Lead
2.- Agrotourism (Spice farms and homestays and walks in agro farms)



Support
Lead
Support
Lead

3.- Nature Sanctuaries (EF)


Lead
-
Lead Service contract
4.- ‘Slow Movement’ Wellness Centres   Support Lead Support Lead
5.- Nature Cluster (EF)  PPP PPP
6.- Adventure & Sports Tourism  Support Lead Support Lead









Short term: within 3 years Medium term: 3 - 5 years Long term: 5 years/ above

Leisure & Entertainment Programs
Waterfront Promenades
Panaji, Colva, Chapora, Old Goa and Mayem Lake


Flagship programs Quick Wins









Family Entertainment District (inclusive of Themed Park)
In the vicinity of the proposed Mopa airport



Gaming Cluster
Organised gaming clusters along with shifting of the offshore casinos to the Chapora or Chicalim Bay


Golf Courses
1 in the hinterland/ 1 in vicinity of Mopa airport subject to space availability and Govt. norms



Waterfront promenades




Commercial strategy • Waterfront cities with unique urban structure and programs that draw international attention
Implementati
on strategy • Launch a pilot project in Panaji, using as a framework the recently-approved city masterplan.
• After the pilot project, the programme will implement good practices in the processes and will replicate the experience in other major cities along the coast and some river

Key issues to be addressed

• There is a masterplan approved for the development of Panaji city which already proposes a promenade along the coastline between Miramar and Dona Paula.
• Organise and regularise all the uses and activities along the length of the route. This could generate controversy and negative reactions against the plan



Enhancing tourism use and attraction for both locals and tourists




Potential locations Facilities and land requirements
Panaji, Colva, Chapora, Old Goa and
Mayem Lake N/A



Benchmark and character images






Family entertainment district


Key issues to be addressed

• Selection of the most suitable place to locate the project
• Infrastructure improvements envisaged – road access and transportation. Straight connection from/ to the airport will be needed
• Address the potential environmental impacts associated with the development of the program - since these types of tourism activities and experiences might cause greater territorial impacts, the proposal is that these activities would have to be developed in areas of lower environmental value.

A leisure & entertainment hub for the family offering a themed park, F&B, shopping an accommodation





Potential locations Facilities and land requirements
In the vicinity of the proposed Mopa airport N/A



Benchmark and character images







Gaming cluster


Commercial strategy • Goa will offer a lively and properly- organized cluster on/off shore cluster located outside of Panaji city
Implementati on strategy • The relocation proposal, either further inland or on floating casinos in the bays of Chapora or Chicalim should be carried out in a planned and progressive way. The first step should be to stop the approval of new licences and subsequently provide a margin (2 to 5 years) for casinos to relocate.


Key issues to be addressed

• Keeping the gaming activity as a major source of income and an attraction for this tourism, while controlling and mitigating its negative image?
• Not to be mixed with any other types of entertainment and leisure activities
• Casinos are seen as a negative influence on society in general and youth in particular.
• There is also opposition to the so called offshore casinos, which refuse to go onshore.

A proper organized on/ off shore cluster located outside of Panaji city

Draft for discuss3ion






Potential locations Facilities and land requirements
Organized gaming clusters along with shifting of the offshore casinos to the Chapora or Chicalim Bay
N/A



Benchmark and character images








Golf courses


Key issues to be addressed

• In addition to the 9—hole golf course at the Lalit hotel in South Goa, another 9-hole golf course is already planned with the Four Seasons hotel next to Tiracol Fort
• Construction of a golf course with due regard to the Goan landscape and environs.
• Possible incompatibility with the land use scheme proposed in the Regional Plan.
• Address the potential environmental impacts associated with the development of the programme

Draft for discuss4ion
An eco-friendly 9-hole golf course paired with a renown international hotel brand




Potential locations Facilities and land requirements
1 in the hinterland/ 1 in vicinity of Mopa Airport subject to space availability and Govt. norms
30 ha / 9-hole golf course



Benchmark and character images








Leisure & Entertainment Programs – Initial investment concepts

Estimations refer to the costs of building one unit/ facility

Programs cost concept Unit of Cost per Number of Total Cost measure unit (INR) units (INR Cr.) Financial Model
Public Private

1.- Waterfront Promenades Construction of 1 Km of
Linear metre 13,762 1,000 1.37 100%
Promenade
2.- Family Entertainment District (inclusive of Themed Park) Themed Park + 3 Themed Hotels
(950 keys) + 700 Serviced
District 2,752.4 Cr. 1 2752.4 100%
Apartments + 30,000 sq. m. of
retail

3.- Gaming Cluster Relocation of existing casinos
either inland (Cluster) or to District 55,048,000 1 5.5 100% another Bay + Parking
4.- Golf Course Eco-friendly Executive Golf
Hole 220,192,000 9 22.01 100%
course











These costs do not include the cost of land
(*) Investment is subject to specific project conditions and may vary largely depending on location, site preparation, golf course construction works and development program

Leisure & Entertainment Programs – Estimated initial investment (phased over the next 10 years)



L&E Programs Yearly Budget Number of projects Total (INR Cr.)
2018
2019
2020
2021
2022
2023
2024
2025
2026
2027
1.- Waterfront Promenades 14 km of Promenade
19.3
9.6
9.6
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
2.- Family Entertainment District (inclusive of Themed Park)

1 District

2752.4

-

-

-

-

-

550.5

550.5

550.5

550.5

550.5
3.- Gaming Cluster 1 Cluster 5.5 1.8 1.8 1.8 - - - - - - -
4.- Golf Course 1 Golf Course 22.0 - - - - - - - 7.3 7.3 7.3
Total L&E Programs Budget
2799.2
11.5
11.5
1.8
-
-
550.5
550.5
557.8
557.8
557.8
(%) 100% 0.41% 0.41% 0.07% - - 19.67% 19.67% 19.93% 19.93% 19.93%

Leisure & Entertainment Programs – Reinvestment (1.5% of estimated initial

Draft for discussion

investment)



L&E Programs Yearly Budget Number of projects Total (INR Cr.)
2018
2019
2020
2021
2022
2023
2024
2025
2026
2027
1.- Waterfront Promenades 14 km of Promenade
2.3
-
-
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.3
2.- Family Entertainment District (inclusive of Themed Park)

1 District

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-
3.- Gaming Cluster 1 Cluster 0.6 - - - 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1
4.- Golf Course 1 Golf Course - - - - - - - - - - -
Total L&E Programs Budget
2.9
-
-
0.3
0.4
0.4
0.4
0.4
0.4
0.4
0.4
(%) 100% - - 10.00% 12.86% 12.86% 12.86% 12.86% 12.86% 12.86% 12.86%



L&E Programs Yearly Budget Number of projects Total (INR cr.)
2018
2019
2020
2021
2022
2023
2024
2025
2026
2027
1.- Waterfront Promenades 14 km of Promenade
21.6
9.6
9.6
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.3
2.- Family Entertainment District (inclusive of Themed Park)

1 District

2,752.4

-

-

-

-

-

550.5

550.5

550.5

550.5

550.5
3.- Gaming Cluster 1 Cluster 6.1 1.8 1.8 1.8 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1
4.- Golf Course 1 Golf Course 22.0 - - - - - - - 7.3 7.3 7.3
Total L&E Programs Budget

2,802.1

11.5

11.5

2.1

0.4

0.4

550.9

550.9

558.2

558.2

558.2
(%) 100% 0.41% 0.41% 0.08% 0.01% 0.01% 19.66% 19.66% 19.92% 19.92% 19.92%



Leisure & Entertainment Budget Total Distribution by Program

Leisure & Entertainment Budget Public Vs. Private

Gaming

Waterfront

Golf Course, 0.8%

Cluster, 0.2% Promenades,
0.8%











Family Entertainment District (inclusive of Themed Park), 98.2%

Public, 0.8%


Private, 99.2%





Total expected cost
(over the next 10 years)
INR 2802.1 Cr.

Leisure & Entertainment Programs – Facility Management Recurrent Expenditures (2% of estimated initial investment)



L&E Programs Yearly Budget Number of projects Total (INR Cr.)
2018
2019
2020
2021
2022
2023
2024
2025
2026
2027
1.- Waterfront Promenades 14 km of Promenade
3.1
-
-
0.4
0.4
0.4
0.4
0.4
0.4
0.4
0.4
2.- Family Entertainment District (inclusive of Themed Park)

1 District
Not estimated

3.- Gaming Cluster
1 Cluster Not estimated
4.- Golf Course 1 Golf Course Not estimated
Total L&E Programs Budget
3.1
-
-
0.4
0.4
0.4
0.4
0.4
0.4
0.4
0.4
(%) 100% - - 12.50% 12.50% 12.50% 12,50% 12.50% 12.50% 12.50% 12.50%







Facility Management Recurrent Expenditures refers to maintenance, cleanliness and security of the facility Private annual recurrent expenses related with Facility Management are not estimated

Leisure & Entertainment Programs– Financing Options


Leisure & Entertainment Program Initiatives
Waterfront Promenades Family Entertainment District (inclusive of Themed Park) Gaming Cluster Golf Course
 State and Central government support for development of sea face and river fronts  PPP model of financing for key projects

 Private funding for individual projects  Private funding for individual projects  Financing through global private firms

 Funding by top star hotel chains to give exclusivity to tourists

Leisure & Entertainment Programs – summary




Program Flagship program ‘Quick win’ Short term Medium term Long term Public Private Public Private

1.- Waterfront Promenades



Lead
Support
Lead Service
contract
2.- Family Entertainment District (inclusive of Themed Park)


Support
Lead
-
Lead
3.- Gaming Cluster   Support Lead - Lead
4.- Golf Course  - Lead - Lead









Short term: within 3 years Medium term: 3 - 5 years Long term: 5 years/ above

MICE (Meetings, incentives, conferences & exhibitions) & Weddings Programs




Convention Centre + Ancillary facilities (including Hotels)
Vicinity of proposed Mopa airport (Pernem) or Panaji in Dona Paula area – subject to
availability of land






Mass Events
Shyama Prasad Indoor Stadium, Vagator and Candolim







Weddings and Incentive Trips
All across Goan Hotels and ancillary facilities at the Convention Centre




Flagship programs Quick Wins



Convention Centre + ancillary facilities (including hotels)


Product: MICE & Weddings tourism
Flagship program Quick wins

Timeframe: Long term


• MICE tourism is a good way to attract tourists out of the high season and weekends and fill up hotels during the low season. It is also a good way to take tourist away from the most concentrated tourism areas.
• Though meetings are well develop in Goa, large conventions are not, as there is no Convention and Exhibition centre in the capital. In order to adapt to the market and offer this tourism product, Goa needs a proper Convention Centre with capacity for up to 10,000 people as well as improve the value chain and complementary







Key issues to be addressed

• It must be in close proximity to transportation and airport access routes

products serviced with these facilities. The Convention Centre
should be part of a mixed-use complex also offering retail, F&B
and accommodation options.

• Friendliness and attractiveness of the destination is as important as the development of the complex
• Other attractions besides the meeting facilities are also necessary to create interest in the city as a destination – people coming to the Conference Centre may be attracted commercial/ leisure/ entertainment attractions. Maybe there is an interesting link of this program to the Family Entertainment District (see Leisure & Entertainment programs)
• Also, existing hotel facilities must adapt to MICE products (addition of new units should be also contemplated) so that enough rooms and conference space is available

A world-class Convention Centre in the vicinity of the proposed Mopa airport to launch Goa as a competitive destination for MICE tourism



Potential locations Facilities and land requirements
Vicinity of proposed Mopa airport (Pernem) or Panaji in Dona Paula area
– subject to availability of land
-



Benchmark and character images










Mass events


Key issues to be addressed

• Ideally in close proximity to transportation and airport access or facilitation must be provided
• Keep current events and also generate new ones
• Ensure maximum professionalism in the organization of the event and mitigate potential nuisance to local residents and to the overall tourism image of Goa
• Involve multiple local stakeholders: public, private, and civil society













Market
strategy • To promote Goa’s uniqueness and make “noise” about Goa
as a lively and entertaining place


Mass events should focus on the low season and be supportive to Goa’s tourism positioning




Potential locations Facilities and land requirements
Shyama Prasad Indoor Stadium, Vagator and Candolim N/A



Benchmark and character images









Weddings and incentive trips


Commercial strategy • Goa is a unique and vibrant place to celebrate a wedding or an incentive trip
Implementati on strategy • Establish a marketing club of a number of high quality properties, starting with those already working on the development and promotion of weddings and incentive trips.

Key issues to be addressed

• Activities related to skills, local culture, sports, adventure tourism, nature, food and drinks should be also developed to offer an attractive weddings and incentive trips product.
• Better policies and promotions for developing the destination wedding market
• Dissemination of information on key modalities and procedures including public performance license, sound restrictions, Visa formalities and wedding registration would facilitate development of this product
• Development of complementary tourism products like wellness, adventure tourism and others to improve on the average length of stay of tourists during MICE visits.


Goa by virtue of its lush green forests and fields, as well as its picturesque beaches is a key venue for destination weddings




Potential locations Facilities and land requirements
All across Goan Hotels and ancillary facilities at the Convention Centre -



Benchmark and character images








MICE & Weddings Programs – Initial investment concepts

Estimations refer to the costs of building one unit/ facility

Programs cost concept Unit of Cost per Number of Total Cost measure unit (INR) units (INR Cr.) Financial Model
Public Private

1.- Convention Centre + ancillary facilities (including Hotels)* Convention Centre to cater for
Sq. m. 47,135 10,000 47.1 100%
up to 10,000 people
Ancillary facilities of the
Convention Centre including Keys 68,810 60,000 412.8 100% several 4-star Hotels (1,000 keys)
2.- Mass Events N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
3.- Weddings and Incentive Trips
N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A














These costs do not include the cost of land
(*) Investment is subject to specific project conditions and may vary largely depending on location, site preparation, marina construction works and development program

MICE & Weddings Programs – Estimated initial investment (phased over the next 10 years)



M&W Programs Number of
Yearly Budget projects Total (INR Cr.)
2018
2019
2020
2021
2022
2023
2024
2025
2026
2027
1.- Convention Centre + 1 Convention ancillary facilities Centre + ancillary
(including Hotels) facilities
460.0
-
-
-
-
-
153.3
153.3
153.3
-
-
2.- Mass Events N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
3.- Weddings and
N/A
Incentive Trips
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
Total M&W Programs Budget
460.0
-
-
-
-
-
153.3
153.3
153.3
-
-
(%) 100% - - - - - 33.33% 33.33% 33.33% - -

MICE & Weddings Programs – Reinvestment (1.5% of estimated initial investment)


M&W Programs Number of
Yearly Budget projects Total (INR Cr.)
2018
2019
2020
2021
2022
2023
2024
2025
2026
2027
1.- Convention Centre + 1 Convention ancillary facilities Centre + ancillary
(including Hotels) facilities
13.8
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
6.9
6.9
2.- Mass Events N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
3.- Weddings and
N/A
Incentive Trips
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
Total M&W Programs Budget
13.8
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
6.9
6.9
(%) 100% - - - - - - - - 50.00% 50.00%



M&W Programs Number of
Yearly Budget projects Total (INR Cr.)
2018
2019
2020
2021
2022
2023
2024
2025
2026
2027
1.- Convention Centre + 1 Convention ancillary facilities Centre + ancillary
(including Hotels) facilities
473.8
-
-
-
-
-
153.3
153.3
153.3
6.9
6.9
2.- Mass Events N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
3.- Weddings and
N/A
Incentive Trips
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
Total M&W Programs Budget
473.8
-
-
-
-
-
153.3
153.3
153.3
6.9
6.9
(%) 100% - - - - - 32.36% 32.36% 32.36% 1.46% 1.46%



MICE & Weddings Budget Total Distribution by Program

MICE & Weddings Budget Public Vs. Private


Public, 0.0%





Total expected cost
(over the next 10 years)
INR 473.8 Cr.

MICE & Weddings Programs – Operating expenditures (2% of estimated initialDraft for discussion
investment)



M&W Programs Number of
Yearly Budget projects Total (INR Cr.)
2018
2019
2020
2021
2022
2023
2024
2025
2026
2027
1.- Convention Centre + 1 Convention ancillary facilities Centre + ancillary
(including Hotels) facilities
18.4
9.2
9.2
2.- Mass Events 6 Events/ Year 20.6 2.1 2.1 2.1 2.1 2.1 2.1 2.1 2.1 2.1 2.1
3.- Weddings and Incentive Trips
Not estimated
Total M&W Programs Budget
39.0
2.1
2.1
2.1
2.1
2.1
2.1
2.1
2.1
11.3
11.3
(%) 100% 5.29% 5.29% 5.29% 5.29% 5.29% 5.29% 5.29% 5.29% 28.85% 28.85%











Facility Management Recurrent Expenditures refers to maintenance, cleanliness and security of the facility Private annual recurrent expenses related with Facility Management are not estimated

MICE & Weddings Programs – Financing Options


MICE & Weddings Program Initiatives
Convention Centre + ancillary facilities (including Hotels) Mass Events Weddings and Incentive Trips
 Financing options would include PPP with major F&B brands and hotel chains entering into BOT contract with the State government

 Private funding for individual projects  Funding support can be attained through theme parks and tourism firms

 Private funding for individual projects  Funding through global tourism companies with support from State government

 Private funding for individual projects

MICE & Weddings Programs – summary






Program Flagship program ‘Quick win’ Short term Medium term Long term Public Private Public Private
1.- Convention Centre + Ancillary facilities (including Hotels)


PPP
PPP
2.- Mass Events   PPP PPP
3.- Weddings and Incentive Trips   Support Lead - Lead












Short term: within 3 years Medium term: 3 - 5 years Long term: 5 years/ above

Tourism Programs - Estimated costing overview
Consolidated Yearly Budget Total (INR Cr.) Private investment (INR cr.) (%) Public Investment (INR cr.) (%)
Coastal 493.0 368.8 74.8% 124.2 25.2%
Culture & Heritage 144.6 2.9 2.0% 141.7 98.0%
Nature Based 283.0 159 56.2% 124 43.8%
Leisure & Entertainment 2,802 2,778.6 99.2% 23.4 0.8%
MICE & Weddings 473.8 473.8 100.0% - -
Total 4196.6 3,785.3 90.2% 411.3 9.8%





MICE &

Budget
Total Distribution by Program

Coastal, 11.7%

Budget
Public Vs. Private



Public, 9.8%

Weddings,
11.3%

Leisure & Entertain ment,

Culture & Heritage, 3.4%
Nature Based, 6.7%





Total expected cost (over the next 10 years) INR 4196.6 Cr.





Private, 90.2%




Consolidated Number of beds Number of rooms
Total investment (in INR Cr.)

2021 2026 2031
84,991 119,204 167,189
42,497 59,603 83,595
4,142 7,041.4 9,845.2




Current Classification Number of beds Star-rating Number of INR/ Incremental
rooms Unit Investment in INR Cr.
Category A 17,177 5-star 8,589 82,57,200 1,434
Category B 21,198 4-star 10,599 55,04,800 1,479
Category C 18,923 3-star 9,462 27,52,400 718
Category D 27,636 2-star and below 13,318
13,76,200 505
Homestay 500
Category Heritage 57 Heritage 29 20,64,300 5.9
Total by 2021 84,991 - 42,497 - 4,142

* At 2016 prices


Current Classification No. of beds Star-rating Number of rooms INR/ Incremental Investment
Unit in INR Cr.
Category A 24,092 5-star 12,046 82,57,200 2,854.5
Category B 29,731 4-star 14,866 55,04,800 2,370.9
Category C 26,540 3-star 13,270 27,52,400 1,048.1

Category D 38,761 2-star and below 18,631 731.2
13,76,200
34.4
Homestay 750
Category Heritage 80 Heritage 40 20,64,300 2.3
Total by 2026 119,204 - 59,603 - 7,041.4

Current Classification No. of beds Star-rating Number of rooms INR/ Incremental Investment
Unit in INR Cr.
Category A 33,790 5-star 16,895 82,57,200 4,003.9
Category B 41,699 4-star 20,850 55,04,800 3,294.1
Category C 37,224 3-star 18,612 27,52,400 1,470.3

Category D 54,364 2-star and below 26,182 1,039.2
13,76,200
34.4
Homestay 1,000
Category Heritage 112 Heritage 56 20,64,300 3.3
Total by 2031 167,189 - 83,595 - 9.845.2




Key initiative is the Coastal Tourism Circuit which are being carried out through procurement of Govt. of


Regeneration/ Upgradation of Popular Beaches India funds under The Swadesh Darshan scheme. Some key projects of this include the following:
• Provision of public amenities at Baga, Candolim, Vagator, Anjuna and Morjim beaches
• Toilets
• Cloak room
• Drinking water
• Changing/ shower rooms
• Development of parking lot at Calangute
• Dust Bins, Solar powered street lighting, tourism signage's, installation of CCTV cameras and Wi-Fi
facilities at various beaches in Goa
• Procurement of 200 mobile bio toilets









Tourism circuits – 26 types



• Military: Forts
• Religious : Churches/ Temples/ Mosques
• Portuguese heritage/ legacy:
Churches/ Houses
• Goa Old Town (City tour to places of historical/ cultural importance)
• Charming villages
• Handicrafts route in villages (‘Azulejos’ Tiles, Coconut, Woodcraft, Terracotta, Pottery)
• Prehistoric sites
(Petroglyphs, Caves)
• Culinary Tourism route
(including Feni & Wine)
• Best of Culture

• Scenic Routes
• Wildlife Sanctuaries and National Parks
• Farms: Spice/ Cashew/ Areca nut/ Coconut/ Rubber
• Animal sighting
• Birding
• Protected marine life (turtle nesting, dolphin experiences and corals)
• Backwaters exploration
• Reptile/ Amphibian/ Insect viewing
• Best of Nature

• River Cruise
• Train route from N to S and W to E
• Bicycle tracks near rivers/ in Natural Parks
• Trekking routes
• Coastal circuits:
• Forts
• Old Town
• Turtle nesting
• View Point
• Hinterland circuits:
• Spice Farms
• Wildlife
• Waterfalls
• River Cruise
• Wellness in nature
• Panaji Circuit
• Fontainhas
• Mandovi River Cruise
• Bird Sanctuary
• Old Goa
• Best of Goa

Connectivity Strategy – Tourism circuits infrastructure needs – culture & heritage


Connectivity Strategy – tourism circuits infrastructure needs – nature/eco


Connectivity/ Infrastructure Strategy for tourism circuits to spread tourism across the state

Key facilitating Infrastructure:
• Interpretation/ Information centres
• Information kiosks and marketing material
• Circuit itineraries, including travel options (possibly posted on the website)
• Signage along circuits with asset descriptions on site
• Local guides, interpreters and translators
• Barrier free access and facilitating infrastructure for specially abled persons including paraphernalia
• Transportation Hubs
• Multiple accommodation types for various target travellers
• Food and drinking water facilities
• Town/ City/ Village walking routes with maps, along with standardised walkways and footpaths
• Quality, safety and hygiene programs
• Garbage management
• Foreign exchange kiosks at key tourism hotspots
• Kiosks providing subscriber identity module (SIM) cards at key tourism hotspots
• Information provision through websites and mobile applications, besides social media platforms
• Development of modes of mass transport between key tourism assets/ hotspots
• Provision of cycles and alternative modes of transport including electrically powered vehicles





























3.



Support tourism infrastructure Buy side infrastructure
Public amenities and services in Goa
Core infrastructure
Transport and connectivity
Human resource and training


Infrastructure Strategy – Support Infrastructure

Source: Public Works Department ; T E R I. 2012, Directions, Innovation and Strategies for Sustainable Development in Goa, National Health Mission


Air

• The Concession Agreement for setting up the Mopa airport has been signed in November 2016, and is expected to have a passenger handling capacity of 13.1 million per annum by 2036
• The airport is expected to be set up by 2019-20, and will boost air connectivity of Goa along with easing the capacity constraint at Dabolim
• Goa is well connected to major states across the country. Better connectivity to major cities besides Mumbai and Delhi is the need of the hour
• Goa currently has direct flight connectivity to destinations in the Middle East which forms a hub for international arrivals.
• Charters are an important mode of transport for international travelers, and promotion efforts should be made on attracting higher spend packages
• However, greater emphasis needs to be laid on attracting
Free Independent Travelers (FITs)
• The recently released National Civil Aviation Policy is expected to promote air connectivity across the nation, including the Regional connectivity programme

Source: RFQ Document for the Mopa Greenfield airport project



Connectivity Strategy – Tourism signage system

• The state has limited general signage and indeed a tourism signage system.
• A good and consistent sign posting system is extremely relevant in any tourist destination but even more for those like Goa, which is and can be visited mostly by road, thanks to short distances between attractions.
• Many of the new products that have been proposed for the Master Plan invite tourists to enjoy them best through circuits, mostly by road, though some also using river transportation.







Awareness programs Training programs

Support programs (Companies Incubator)


• HR Service Centres provide skills and support to local people to:
• create new businesses
• improve existing ones
• increase awareness
• carry out training and support programs


• Service Centers link the demand from local population to create Micro and Small Enterprises and the supply which take into consideration the gaps that exist in the rural tourism sector and the employment in Goa, especially in the hinterlands.
• The awareness centers provide a platform to interact with local stakeholders and design implementation strategies based on local strengths and opportunities, besides providing a platform for grass root engagement







Awareness programs Training programs

Support programs (Companies Incubator)



A website, on-line courses and an employment database, should also link all the centers and further facilitate human resource development
The implementation of Services centers for Human Resources Development will:
• Increase awareness of the importance of the development and at the same time competitiveness of tourism in Goa as a whole destination, as well as in the different coastal and hinterland tourism destinations.
• Increase the professionalism and know-how of the local stakeholders and public administrations for the development of a marketable higher-end and sustainable tourism in Goa. Increase the quality of services by providing skilled and educated human resources
• Increase the opportunities for local residents to take advantage of the development of tourism in Goa, especially those located in the Hinterlands.
• Provide support to entrepreneurs, professional improvement and creation of employment









• Provision for dedicated tourist police at tourist hotspots
• Specialized training for tourist police for interacting with tourists in Goa, including application of technology on ground
• Ensure collaboration between tourist police and other Department police personnel
• Personnel to ensure maintenance of law and order at tourist places, and assist the DoT in implementation
of its responsibilities under law.
• Collaboration between DoT and the Goa Institute of Public Administration Department (GIPARD) to impart requisite training to tourist police, along with relevant refresher courses
• Security awareness planning
• Training of tourist police to deal with emergency situations
• Monitoring of tourism hotspots and places real time, through a CCTV network
• Security awareness programs among tourist trade and other stakeholders
• Tourist information centers to convey information on safety and security
• Real time monitoring of deployment of tourist security force, and spread across the state
• Consistent and highly visible signage across the state, including at tourism assets





























4.

Commercialization & Promotion Tourism statistics collection framework
Destination C&P
Products C&P


Tourism intelligence unit




UNWTO’s (United Nations World Tourism Organization) TSA framework is a set of summary tables, with underlying data:
♦ inbound, domestic tourism and outbound tourism expenditure;
♦ internal tourism expenditure;
♦ production accounts of tourism industries;
♦ the Gross Value Added (GVA) and Gross Domestic Product (GDP) attributable to tourism;
♦ employment;
♦ investment;
♦ government consumption, and
♦ non-monetary indicators.


Tourism intelligence unit - Tourism Satellite Account (TSA)









Compile data from tax authorities,
and other public directories.

Set up specific Directory for main tourism activities to define a proper inference framework and obtain estimates for main economic supply variables.

Design applied inference method on
procurement of the Directory. The specification of a survey has to be derived to get estimates for each one of the Directory activities
DoT and GTDC to define the statistical scope of such estimates according to budget constraints and policy maker needs.

Forms, field survey organization
and training for field personnel are a key process for a successful survey.
DoT and GTDC to prepare a systematic and permanent yearly survey to producers.


Tourism intelligence unit - Tourism demand statistics collection framework

Program aim






Detailed expenditure form in surveys
applied to visitors leaving the country

Survey for residents who come back to the country
A field statistical process is required to apply the emissive tourism survey at the airport and main land frontier controls.

Accurate statistics for arriving and departing passengers is important to identify properly tourists, excursionists and workers who are involved in daily flows over the frontiers throughout the country.
Official accounting of people that arrive and leave the country every day should be defined. The estimate of tourism demand is based on these records

Specific surveys to households for domestic tourism estimates.
The inference framework and the field organization, as well as the questionnaires have to be worked out with international assistance.

Various physical and emotional elements experienced by tourists while visiting Goa
Physical elements Emotional elements



Unique Selling Proposition of Goa’s tourism offering
Unique Selling Proposition (USP):
• Tangible: Colonial past blended with idyllic inland landscapes
• Intangible: Goan “Susegad” lifestyle, reflecting in the citizens way of life (relaxed attitude and enjoyment of life to the fullest)
“Susegad” is a sense that prevails across the Goan countryside, in its culture and traditions. It is professed as a way of life in Goa, and presents a feeling of general contentment and well being.
This way of life encompasses Goa tourism resulting in repeat visits to the state, many a times across generations.
Differentiating factors:

• “Beach relax & party”: Goa is mainly known for its trance and beach parties that
is very restrictive in terms of market segments’ attractions.

However it is a strong differentiating factor, especially for the domestic market and should not be abandoned but up scaled and transformed into more and better experiences.
• Mix of cultures: Unique juxtaposition of Indian, Portuguese and Arabic heritage
• Nature and culture components along the coast and hinterlands are varied, widespread and easy to reach (short distances)


Getting tourists to associate certain keywords with Goa is a key aim of the Tourism Master Plan

Shared vision for Goa
‘Susegad’ lifestyle (relaxed attitude and enjoyment of life to the fullest)

World class experience Distinctive hospitality Local flavours Portuguese heritage Nature preserved
Entertainment/ lively destination Active / passive adventure Wellness destination Sustainable
Nightlife


Enhancing the Goa brand: Adding a Baseline and Story telling

Context & objective




• Recently a new brand was designed for Goa, development of which included a new logo and application manual
• As per international practice of many world destinations, there is an opportunity to further enhance the brand by adding a tag or baseline to the logo
• Moreover, a “story” or short text of Goa as a tourist destination could be written in order to describe the aspirational Goa tourism
• Finally, the brand could be still enhanced by adapting Goa’s defined colors to promotion materials, physical assets, merchandising, handicraft, etc. to be used as “symbols” that people will remember and associate with Goa’s destination personality.
Base line • A baseline, aims to highlight and summarize under a single word, group of words or sentence, the essence of what Goa can offer to tourists.
• While it is advisable to keep the same logo for a long term (10 years or more), baseline can be changed and adapted
every 5 years, if needed, to reflect what Goa wants to enhance as a destination.




Storytelling • A short text written by a Goan journalist or writer to synthetize the essence of Goa’s experience, could take Goa’s history as a guideline and introduce other concepts. This story /text, should be used as in introduction to all online and offline materials used to describe and differentiate the whole tourism destination
• Though visuals are important, if a story is character and narrative driven it has a better chance at striking an emotional chord with an audience. If a destination can tell a story that resonates emotionally with an audience, they can overcome just about anything.
• The strategic importance of storytelling for a tourism destination:
• Stories are hard for others to copy
• Good stories can result in lots of word-of-mouth
• Myths can be created
• Fascinating stories create curiosity
• Stories as catalyst of destination development


Your views on enhancing the new Goa brand: Baseline and Story telling










Base line

• A baseline, aims to highlight and summarize under a single word, group of words or sentence, the essence of what Goa can offer to tourists. While it is advisable to keep the same logo for a long term (10 years or more), baseline can be changed and adapted every 5 years, if needed, to reflect what Goa wants to enhance as a destination.
• Some examples of relevant domestic and international tourism destinations have been shown below
• Implementation guidelines:
• The baseline should serve to highlight the desired evolution of Goa from a pure beach destination towards an integrated coastal, cultural and nature-based destination, likely to attract higher spending tourists from both India and abroad. The tag or baseline should put forward the unique “blend” of natural and historic features, all present and enjoyable within short distances.
• Creative part to be developed by a specialized creative agency, under the guidance of and validation by Goa tourism stakeholders, from the public and private sectors.







Promotion strategy – Goa’s expenditure in marketing & promotion




Detailed Marketing Budget FY 15/16

* Amount in ‘000,000 (INR)

Tourism Marketing budgets Goa



Miscellaneous Advertisements, souveniers etc.
Printing of brochers, pamplets, banners and other such items State events - (e.g. Grape escapade, coconut and cashew festival) State events - (e.g. GITM, heritage and tripurari)
Infrastructure for State events State events - (e.g. Carnival and Shigmo) Media campaign spreads - Domestic Media campaign spreads - International
TA - DA Domestic TA - DA International
Domestic exhibitions - space booking
Domestic Road Shows International exhibitions - space booking Road show/ Exhibition - International

0.51
0.51







0.31



1.03




1.54


1.23
1.03
1.54
1.03









3.08






4.10




5.13


5.13





6.15


• The overall budget has been increased by 21% from 2014 to 2015, in line with total arrivals growth
• Marketing budget is today oriented to promotion of domestic tourism (61% of total expenditures), as this market is represents 90% of total arrivals.
8.71


Promotion strategy – Benchmark on marketing expenditure

























5 Goa





+ 50 M




+20 M





+2 M




1 or less M



0.5 M





50 M




40 M





15 M




5 M



0.57 M





1 USD or less




3-4 USD





5-6 USD




7-8 USD



0.4 USD

Key takeaways
• Countries with large amounts of international tourists arrivals spend around 1 dollar per arrival though they have the highest budgets
• In second-tier volume tourist destinations, the less tourist arrivals, the more average spending per arrival reaching around 8 USD
• Goa needs to invest a larger amount in international budget in order to get closer to the average spending. Nowadays it seems to be far away from the standards:
0.4 US$ versus 5 to 8 US$ per arrival in
comparable sample of destinations

• On the other hand, it is true that this highest spending needs to be mitigated because India’s marketing budget would to a certain extent cover this need, as it

promotes the country as a whole


SWOT on Goa’s Marketing Promotion & Communication

Strengths Weaknesses
• Brand positioning not clear; some of the brand attributes are not conducive to attracting high-end tourists.
• Low marketing budget

• Active promotions and focus on emerging tourism centers such as China by Bali tourism have helped in achieving a large growth in tourists.
• Catalan Tourist Board has redefined its mission and vision in order to lead Catalonia’s tourism development and marketing and achieve the goals of increasing tourist revenues



• Availability of Multiple Tourist Products & Resources to Develop Goa into a Top Destination
• Promote tourist arrivals from markets with high number of arrivals in India but low for Goa (USA, Canada)
• Attract tourists by launching a segmented communication by travel motivation and nationality
• Develop a strategy for marketing and communication by product
• Take profit of social media marketing to increase awareness and personalization without relevant additional spending
Opportunities




• Several Indian states are running aggressive international marketing campaigns and have potential to compete with Goa (Kerala is today the strongest competitor using aggressive and focused marketing & promotion techniques)
• Visibility in trade shows is increasing significantly for several Indian states
• e.g. “Barcelona is Much More” campaign gives reasons a tourist should visit the region of Barcelona and not only the city
Threats


Marketing Plan







Marketing Destination Goa as a whole: Proposed approach




Customer intelligence & Campaigns
Storage visitors information to launch

Smart Tourism Destination
Integration of all technologies into an Omni–channel Platform for a seamless digital experience for the end user throughout the whole

segmented campaigns and increase repeat
tourists’ rate

B2B, Events & Congress
It is important to share with

customer journey 8
7
1

Website
Good information platform but there’s a long path to deal with according to relational service, real time information and transactional agreements

intermediaries the new strategy, which 6
could be channeled through a newly established Convention Bureau for all MICE products
Social Media
Today Goa already has a good presence 5
on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram
4




Mobile APP
Explore the possibilities that bring new
2 mobile apps such as, geolocation, beacons or customized contents. It is a good mean to extract valuable information about the customer
3



Press, Publicity & Programmatic Marketing
A step forward needs to be done to develop a segmented and efficient communication through traditional channels and modern one

Key physical Contact Points
Implement ake advantage of key contact points in order to understand, relation and
inform our visitors


Marketing G0A Destination - Website



Frequent actions to be done Website of the future

Update the website periodically to maintain the quality of the information and use the latest technologies

Propose a page with recent news of the tourism industry
and of the country on the website

Create a restricted area for professionals and press

The website should be adapted to the different key
customer segments (language and design preferences)


The website should be available from all main searching engines optimization (SEO) (Google, Bing, etc)
Visitor reports and statistics should be extracted each month of the website in order to verify the frequency of
visits and the visitor characteristics






Digital Travel Planner






Photo sharing, interactive maps, wikis, widgets…






Forum where customers share its experience






Real stories of real customers (Malaysia web)


Marketing G0A Destination – Website evaluation



Detail Mark


Marketing G0A Destination - App



App technology solutions

Real time information such as social media, tourist information (traffic, events), advertising or reminders


Vehicle tracking (bus , metro, taxi, shared cars)

NFC tags and QR codes to access information about nearby points of interest

Tourist Complaints Management System


Proximity marketing Use of beacons



Multi-languages travel guide app which also offers available packages
Proximity marketing with beacons (special discounts, upgrades or cross selling)

Customized digital contents (self segmentation)



Customized digital contents



Interactive Audio guides


Marketing G0A Destination– Key contact points


Strategic methodology
• By knowing the locations of your signs, you will also be able to consider in the environment of the sign
• Identify your main audience and understanding exactly who you are creating content for. Measure how long will be your audience in front of the sign
• Do they need information to guide them? To educate them (tech them about products / services)? To entertain them?

• What do we want our visitors to do? (follow our social media, buy a product, visit a sight). Call- to-actions should be include in our content


• Content change frequency, who creates the content, brand voice / message guidelines…


Press & Publicity: Activities should be developed to communicate the tourism offer, the products and the brands to targeted audiences. In the case of Goa, it seems important to focus on the accessibility of information to journalist and also to create advertisements available to the corporate sector. Moreover, it is increasingly important and cost-efficient to use more online materials and campaigns rather than offline and physical promotion materials and campaigns. Though, offline promotion cannot be eluded.
Specific actions
Press trips

Media database (gathering information on international travel writers and journalists)


Resource library including photos, brand imagery, video clips of local attractions, photo CD
Press clipping

Targeting on specialized press and journals to place effective advertising
Newsletter to international travel writers and journalists

Strategy for celebrities, key opinion leaders or travel
bloggers (strong influencers)




Travel bloggers










Target and segmented publicity




Effective online press room





Strategic methodology
• The path to programmatic begins with the choice of your demand-side-platform (DSP). good DSP must be transparent in their capabilities and data sources
• A data partner should be able to clearly articulate the value of their data and how it will assist you in targeting your campaign to achieve your KPIs
• Upon setting the KPIs for any individual campaign, you should then work backwards from your goals to see which measurements align
• Programmatic is all about delivering the right message to the right audience at the right time. Creativity is capital
• The programmatic opportunity can only be fully exploited if there is a strong post-campaign reporting and analytics system

Example






Goa’s Marketing superstructure – Press, Publicity & Programmatic Marketing



Types of collaterals
• Sales brochures and other printed product information

• Visual aids used in sales presentations

• Web content (photos, 360º views, video)

• Sales scripts

• Demonstration scripts

• Product data sheets

• Product white papers

• promotional pictures




Kerala’s collaterals in website and social media




How to measure success in social media Some inspiration facts

Number of visitors viewing user-generated content (UGC) on the website
Number of visitors viewing UGC on third party sites Number of identified blogs that support the destination Blog activity
Tags / Hashtags
Volume of tags that include optimization engines keywords with presence in websites from priority markets

Specific statistics, such as “Trending topic” or number of “retweet”

Kerala is the destination that spends more effort on social media means. However Goa is already performing well in this field


Sri Lanka

Bali

Ibiza

Kerala

Maldives

Mauritius

Thailand

Goa





6.033

903

23.420

NA

38.235

39.146

615.468







1.149

11.200

14.700

70.300

12.600

15.400

70.400

30.200







59.300

4.000

13.900

57.900

42.400

NA 52.700

20.300





529 NA





52 18.440 NA





NA 2.045





618


Marketing G0A Destination – B2B, Events & Congresses



Objectives B2B stakeholders

• Definition of office/representation model: according to budget and market priorities, the first step is to define the kind of office model among the following options: BTB satellite offices, Tourism Trade Representative, Destination Marketing or PR Company
• Selection of source markets for offices: identification of priority markets and specific locations (cities), where to settle the defined marketing office
• Assessment and revision of network map every 4 years, in order to optimize efforts and resources, redefine the priorities and office models, according to trends, market’s changes and competitiveness situation


Marketing G0A Destination– Customer Intelligence (CI) & Campaigns



Objectives Customer journey map

Develop a customer relationship management in order
to save financial resources and enhance the loyal
visitors’ profitability rather than constantly targeting new visitors and new target markets

Manage the CRM via an IT system which would collect and organize the different data collected about loyal
customers

Manage the platform to distribute personalized information to customers such as newsletter, special
offers to instate a link with them and stimulate repeat business
The CRM system should monitor the use and enjoyment of the new products

Marketing G0A Destination –
integrating it all into a “Smart Tourism” Destination



Integration of different technologies into an omni – channel tourism destination

Smart Tourism Destination beneficiaries










Smart Tourism destination



Types of destination marketing and customization level - Key take-away




All means of mass commercialization and promotion not addressed to any specific public. No specific focus and broad market targeting. No limited timeframe


Specific positioning /selling messages containing a unique differentiation message related to one destination’s feature but addressed to a general public: for instance Kerala's campaign on backwaters tourism. Campaign with limited time frame until another campaign is launched


Specific positioning /selling messages focused on one type of product /main travel motivation and addressed to visitors responding to this interest profile. No limited timeframe


Omni-channel and personalized communication focused on target profile with specific contents catering for his/her preferences. Limited timeframe for each message, as communication is on-going and responsive to personal feedback

Building awareness among local stakeholders: A key success factor


Objectives Types of campaigns

• Definition of different campaigns per year: identification of awareness needs and key audiences to tap; definition of goals and strategies; definition of messages per target and communication tools for each one; definition of seasons and days for domestic tourism campaigns.
• Define the strategic partners per campaigns, such as public- private partnership with local tourism companies
• Define implementation schedule of each campaign

• Define the financial schemes and alternatives for funding

• Monitoring system for campaigns


Promotion & Communication - Key take-aways




Website

Use the web with the aim to build the brand, obtain awareness, attract new customers, transmit experiences and gather useful visitor information. Focused efforts are needed on new and updated content to align with new positioning and products




Mobile App

Key physical Contact Points
Press, Publicity
and Prog.
Mark Social media
B2B, events & Congress
Customer Intelligence & Campaigns
Smart Tourism Destination

Utilise advantages offered by Mobile App technologies like proximity marketing (partnerships), use of beacons, customized digital content or real time information. 85% of visitors use their smartphone when travelling
Place key physical contact points in strategic areas (airport, port, famous attractions…) in order to guide, inform, educate and improve visitor experience

Change advertising / publicity strategy into a cost – effective, targeted and experiential advertising plan

Goa’s social media performance needs to be continued. Focus on quality of materials (video sharing, photos), interaction with visitors and gathering information about them

Define and establish a consistent plan for all intermediaries, from OTAs to specialized agencies.

Goa needs to know more about its visitors and launch campaigns in order to increase revenue (repetition, upgrade, cross selling), improve experience and increase loyalty including visitors’ proactive recommendation
to other potential tourists All the above tools should be integrated with each other and share valuable information and bring the visitor a modern omni – channel destination marketing that give quality experiences





Best practices in marketing & promotion for international tourism






Best practices combine traditional approach and new ways





To generate direct business (tour operators, VIP travel agents, meetings organizers, other intermediaries) and also to indirectly promote the destination through tourism influencers (Indian and foreign celebrities, travel bloggers, etc.) know our destination so that it can then advertise and
market












Social Media

The goal is to use social media as a meeting point between Goans, to share their knowledge and become prescribers of destination, and at the same time, it is the platform for travelers to explain their experiences lived during their trip to and stay in Goa




Partnership

Agreements with local and/or foreign enterprises to promote and commercialize Goa’s product offer together. The selection of those partners need to follow an accurate process and need to share basic principles and values in line Goa’s tourism vison and mission

Goa should selectively attend the most important fairs & exhibitions in the main target markets with the lowest possible investment

Description Target

Most important Exhibitions & Fairs by target country Fairs specialized in particular products


UK: World Travel Market (London)


Germany: ITB (Berlin)


France: IFTM – TOP RESA (Paris)


Russia: MITT (Moscow)


Middle East: Arabian Travel Market (Dubai)

Making a good choice of influencer individuals can be decisive in Goa promotion and communication strategy

Description Target



It is capital to propose continuous training to Goan tourism professionals in order to build a strong offering and individual businesses’ promotion skills

Description Target

Types of workshops


Presentations include all merchandising materials to promote the destination and share useful information

Description Target


In a future stage, GTDC could consider the opportunity of strengthening its presence and actions through a network of “offices” in key markets abroad

Description Target


Future: GTDC Network Offices

 Objective: The mission of the GTDC offices abroad is to publicize the range of tourism options available in Goa and to position the brand by lobbying in the markets they cover. Their other core function is to give direct support to Goan tourism enterprises in their promotion efforts. In addition, they identify and analyze the trends in demand in each market to ensure that the GTDC marketing strategies for the international markets are based on full and accurate information
 Services offered:
o Maintain fluid dialogue with agents in each market: tour
operators, companies, media, etc
o Conduct in-depth studies of each market in their particular sphere and to identify new products and offers
o Benefit from the technical assistance to the Goan tourism industry and support on marketing, promotion and information
o Access to market data

Types of offices




Social media is the most powerful tool to promote, communicate and obtain awareness for a destination

Description Target

Channels tips Best Practice: Kerala

Find up-to-date information, weekly recommendations, competitions, activities, discounts and promotional offers


People can take representative photos of Goa and post and share them with millions of users who have this app. It is the first social network for mobile photography

View and share a large volume of inspiring material on the various destinations in Goa, and also encourages interaction through the comments made by users

Cooperation and even “co-opetition” are powerful tools to promote and communicate Goa abroad

Description Target

Types of partnership Possible Partners


Air companies
Local and foreign companies with direct flights or charters

Celebrities Depending on the market, make a selection of celebrities that share our values to promote our destination
Other Indian States Cooperate with other states to promote circuits in India
and potentially share promotion costs abroad – “co- opetition means collaborating with competitors

Film making Many Bollywood films are being filmed in Goa. Good opportunity to promote the destination
Tourism Intermediaries Agencies, TTOO, OTAs, collaborative tourism (Airbnb for small individual tourism accommodation)
International Quality labels Certification companies focused on the specific products that Goa wants to enhance and promote





Marketing by products / markets: A new way forward




Target
1. Individual end user
2. Specialized Tour Operators (offering segmented experiences)
3. Associations & Clubs of members for a specific activity

Promotion tools
1. Sample itineraries
2. Social media
3. Influencers blogs & fam trips
4. Advertising in specialized websites for each activity
5. Attend specialized trade fairs and congress









Horse riding Trips Cuisine Holidays Golfing Holidays








Rail Holidays Cultural & Art Holidays Painting Holidays


Photography trip Bird watching trip Cycling holidays


Marketing by products / markets: Creating Marketing Clubs










Tourism Product Club Development & Promotion
The following process proposed is adapted to obtain dynamic and attractive clubs to customers and companies. This project aims to create marketable and successful product clubs following the process below:
• Coordination of the initiative by a designated product manager
• Use of market studies to define adapted clubs to the industry and identification of club concepts with specific market needs
• Identification of company prerequisites to join a club – The club must welcome tourism companies and organizations with a minimum of quality requirement
• Identification of the activities and benefits of the club to members
• Selection of the different promotion channels for the club (brochure, roadshow, website, etc.)
• Management of the schemes and definition of roles
• Identification of the type of business to be represented and integrated to the clubs




Tourism product club development
The following process proposed is adapted to obtain dynamic and attractive clubs to customers and companies. This project aims to create marketable and successful product clubs following the process below:
• Coordination of the initiative by the product manager of GTDC
• Use of market studies to define adapted clubs to the industry and identification of club concepts with specific market needs
• Identification of company prerequisites to join a club – The club must welcome tourism companies and organizations with a minimum of quality requirement
• Identification of the activities and benefits of the club to members
• Selection of the different promotion channels for the club (brochure, roadshow, website, etc.)
• Management of the schemes and definition of roles
• Identification of the type of business to be represented and integrated to the clubs


Benefits of joining a Cluster Examples



• Receive tailored marketing tools, reserved exclusively for members of each Cluster
• Have access to specific analysis and technical studies
concerning the different products
• Be referenced as a member of the Club in GTDC site and dedicated pages (certification)
• Share financial resources for a greater impact on markets. Each cluster has a promotion fund constructed with members and other stakeholders contributions
• Adapt and evolve the different products taking into account the different trends and consumption patterns
• Share experiences and expertise with other professionals
• Participate in promotional actions proposed for specific Clusters
• Benefit from working with new market approach












Logos and certification International Cluster
operations












Action Plans




Action Plan example: Promotion of Cultural Tourism in Germany

Actions
• Specific site for German visitors
• Partnership with German companies related to Cultural Activities
• Newsletter with cultural content
• SEO campaigns with google adwords
• Social media support (tweets, posts and links referencing Goan Culture)
• Design a 6 pages advertorial in the supplement Simskultur to insert in
different German magazines and journals: Der Spiegel, Focus, Arte Mag, Woman, Air Berlin, Der Standard







Who participates and how is it organized How is it financed


Example: France Cluster Action Plan






Marketing by products / clusters

Product club development manual


Budget – Benchmark


Benchmark (*)

Country / Region International Budget aprox.
($) Foreign Tourist arrivals Expenditure per arrival
India 26,250,000 7,600,000 3.45 $ / arrival
Mauritius 11,600,000 1,050,000 11.04 $ / arrival
Sri Lanka 5,600,000 1,800,000 3.1 $ / arrival
Dominican Rep. 62,000,000 4,000,000 15.5 $ / arrival
Ecuador 11,000,000 850,000 12.9 $ / arrival
Goa (current) 260,000 500,000 0.52 $ / arrival

(*) Marketing budget data currently unavailable for Kerala


Budget – Proposal - rational


Phases




Budget – Proposal – resulting investment patterns






Budget – Proposal – resulting total promotion spending












































Determination of policies & support schemes needed to implement the Master Plan


Master Plan Policies Application to:













Voluntary



Policies & support schemes for MP programs

Coastal








Regeneration/ Up gradation of beaches





Eco Beach resort







Fishermen Market and F&B Court

• Infrastructure development and enhancement policies for beaches: access, parking, urban design and equipment; beach promenade and access ; beach facilities
• Shacks location and relicensing. Special standards for beachfront shacks


• Designation / confirmation of protected areas and special development areas for tourism use
• Determination of potential tourism uses and density levels
• Similar but more stringent policy as for upgradation of beaches program

• None

• Blue flag standards and label (or similar)
• Shacks’ quality label – specialization label (Goan food)
• Beach management contracts: for access, parking , services, maintenance, cleanliness and security

• Sustainability standards vis a vis use of beaches and tourism development
• Blue Flag standards for beaches and sustainability certification for whole eco-beach development

• Fishermen Market & Food Court
standards
• Goan Culinary label



Policies and support schemes for MP programs


Coastal






High-end music venue paired with luxury lifestyle resort
High-end lifestyle beach club paired with luxury lifestyle resort



• None


• Minimum development guidelines
• Investment promotion and facilitation scheme to attract top international/ national investors and brands






Marinas

• Designation and definition of Marinas, as tourism attractions.


• Sustainability standards vis a vis location and development guidelines

Draft for discussion


Policies and support schemes for MP programs

Culture & Heritage







Fort & monuments






Villages and Old Goan Houses


• None specific beside cultural heritage
laws and regulations




• Designation and definition of Tourism Villages in tourism act, as tourism attractions.

• Minimum and complementary standards for facilities and services to be provided for tourism use
• Information technology tools for visit facilitation: wifi connection, self guiding mobile app (in addition to potential guided visits by professional)
• Minimum standards to apply for “Tourism Village” designation
• Special labels for some facilities within the designated Tourism Villages, such as Old Goan Houses, Handicraft or Goan Cuisine
• Determination of Goan food & drink products, as

• Designation and definition of
Culinary “Culinary Tourism” as part of
tourism attraction.

well as dishes
• Certification scheme / label for products, dishes and F&B outlets





Goa multimedia
Experience

• None • Identify and assign location and building, preferably in Panaji







Nature Clusters


• Designation and definition of “Nature Clusters” in tourism act, as tourism attractions.

• Ensure and develop minimum public infrastructure in the main attractions’ facilities forming part of the Nature Cluster: sign posting for circuit; road access, parking, toilets, permanent electricity, power, water, sewage and mobile and wifi connections
• Minimum and complementary standards for facilities

and services to be provided for tourism use, etc.
• Develop or improve public facilities in main entrance

Nature Sanctuaries • None


• Determination of suitable

point: sign posting and road access, parking, information center, toilets, permanent electricity, power, water, sewage and mobile and wifi connection
• Provide small ports/jetties for boats in strategic locations along the river circuits to facilitate access to and

Discovery River Cruises

rivers and circuits
• Designation and definition of “Discovery River Cruises” as part of tourism attraction

discovery of hinterland
• Provide certification label for boats / companies
dedicated to this product, based on minimum standards related to the boat characteristics and serviced provided



Master Plan Programs

Policies Support schemes

• Minimum standards for facilities and services to be

Adventure & sports tourism

• Designation and definition in Tourism Act of which activities form part of the “Adventure & Sports” Tourism category

provided for these activities in general and specific
requirements for each activity type
• Certification schemes for companies
• Training certification scheme for specialized guides / trainers






Agro tourism (spice farms and homestays and walks in agro farms)

• Designation and definition in Tourism Act of “Agro-tourism farms” and Agro-tourism Stays”

• Certification scheme and quality label for companies belonging to each type of agro-tourism - specialized label or spice farms.






Wellness destination
center

• Designation and definition in Tourism Act of “Slow Movement” Wellness and what is a “Wellness Destination Center”


• Certification scheme and quality label for companies
– defining standards that clearly differentiate a Destination Center” from the provision of wellness services only.






Family Entertainment District




Golf courses


• Designation and definition of “Large Mixed use entertainment District” in tourism act, as tourism attraction.

• Designation and definition of “Eco- friendly Golf Course Development” tourism act, as tourism facility.
• Give priority to development in the hinterland or, at least, not on the coast

• Minimum development guidelines
• Investment promotion and facilitation scheme to attract top international/national investors and brands


• Define development and golf course management guidelines with special emphasis on environmental sustainability




Waterfront promenade • Align policy with Taluka and local
municipality policies

• Provide guidelines to ensure tourism attractiveness of promenades to cater for both residents and tourists (especially domestic)







• Gaming cluster

• Relocation of offshore and nearby onshore gaming in more appropriate location, taking the opportunity to create an international standards gaming cluster

• Identification and allocation of adequate area
• Provide guidelines for the development of a state- of-the art gaming cluster, either offshore (with some services onshore); or onshore; or mixed (offshore and onshore)



Policies and support schemes for MP programs

MICE &
Weddings




Master Plan Programs Policies Support schemes



Mass events







Convention Centre

• Provide support to mass events that are sustaining and showcasing Goas’ new tourism positioning strategy, especially during the low and mid season



• Support the offer of large MICE events in the Sate of Goa by providing a state-of-the –art facility and the set up of
Convention Bureau

• Identify existing mass events that meet this criteria
• Support the creation of new events meeting this criteria
and that would take place during the low and mid season
• Provide guidelines for these events and facilitation services for their celebration (authorities’ approval, support public services, location)
• Public sector to be the main investors in this large facility
• Establishment of a Convention Bureau in partnership with the private sector, in order to promote and manage events in this facility and collaborate with the whole

tourism sector as providers
• Create special club/cluster
• Establish minimum quality standards for establishments

Weddings & Incentive
trips

• Align policy with Taluka and local municipality policies

to qualify for membership
• Promotion support scheme within products/ cluster marketing


Policies & support schemes for TRANSVERSAL programs

Master Plan Programs Policies Support schemes



Licensing / relicensing of specific sectors of activities and quality labels

• Minimum compulsory standards need to be applied to some key activities in Goa: sports & adventure tourism; tourism guides, taxis
• Voluntary application to quality labels to recognize businesses / attractions offering international standards

• Grace period for existing companies
• Soft loans or similar schemes for re- investment to upgrade / adapt buildings/ facilities/ services to new standards

• Awareness and training programs
• Grace period for existing companies

Reclassification and special labels for tourism accommodation

• Reclassification of tourism accommodation: changing A to D model to star-rating system (international standards)
• Voluntary application to special labels to recognize specialization of some properties


• Soft loans or similar schemes for re- investment to upgrade / adapt buildings/ facilities/ services to new standards

• Awareness and training programs



Tourism Intelligence System (TIS)


• Regulations to establish a comprehensive tourism statistics and Tourism Satellite Account System, able to measure tourism performance in a holistic, efficient and reliable way.

• Creation of TIS dedicated section within one existing
• Awareness campaign among tourism
enterprises for providing continuous

and reliable data

Scope of Work / Status

Planning Phase (Phase I) Modules Update
Module 1: Current and projected tourism scenario in Goa and
understanding key gaps Submitted and approved
Module 2: Tourism concepts to attract tourists to Goa Submitted and approved
Module 3: Development of Master Plan Interim Submission for Mod. 3
submitted and approved

Final report submitted for discussion
Module 4: Development of Tourism Policy


To be submitted
Module 5: Review and recommendations on strengthening
institutional and economic linkages
Module 6: Action plan






Draft for discussion






Thank you



This draft report has been submitted solely for discussion purposes with the Govt./ Committee constituted vide Order no. 7/5/WC-TMP/2014-DT/1745


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